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Full text of "Chestnut Burr, 1922"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/chestnutburr1922kent 



THE CHESTNUT BURR 

Published by 

THE SENIOR CLASS 

1922 

Engravings by 
YOUNGSTOWN ARC ENGRAVING COMPANY 

Printing by 

THE DERRICK PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Oil City, Pennsylvania 

Photographs by 

THE READ STUDIO 

Kent. Ohio 

and 

PROFESSOR FRANK N. HARSH 





®1|^ (Elj^Btnut lurr 

A f par Inok 




2Cpttt ^lat? Nnrmal (Enllege 





FOREWORD 

We do not profess to be skilled in the art of 
book-making. We present this volume to you, 
regretting that it is no better, but rejoicing that 
it is no worse. Our work has not been all 
play. Our muses w^ould not always respond, 
but we have w^orked bravely on and this is the 
result. 

To the Senior the annual is the mirror of his 
college career. To the undergraduates and 
faculty, w^e hope that it will realize the dream 
of uniting us as friends. 

We have brought you all to the same level, 
and have laughed with you, not at you. No 
malice is intended; we have charity for all, 
and in your charity we expect you to believe 
in our charity, and so laugh w^ith us. 



CHESTNUT "{" DURP^ 




'AND THO WE LEAVE YOUR CAMPUS' 



CHESTNUT "{'i DUPP^ 



Go little book, and wish to all 

Flowers in the garden, meat in the hall, 

A bin of w^ine, a spice of wit, 

A house wth lawns enclosing it, 

A living river by the door, 

A nightingale in the sycamore! 

ROBERT L. STEVENSON. 



CHESTNUT "{" DURP^ 




DEDICATION 

As a token of our appreciation of her un- 
stinted and unselfish labor for broad and liberal 
education and for the never-failing interest and 
sympathy she has always given to the student 
body, wre the Senior Class of 1 922 dedicate this 
Chestnut Burr to 

SUSAN BURDICK DAVIS 



CHESTNUT ///// DURB^ 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

John A. McDowell, President . . . Ashland 

Sherwood D. Shankland, Secretary . Willoughby 

David Ladd Rockwell .... . Ravenna 

David C. Wills Cleveland 

William A. Cluff Cleveland 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPP^ 



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CHESTNUT "{" DUPBL_ 




President John Edward McGilvrey 
10 



CHESTNUT "[" DUPP^ 




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FACULTY 
11 



CHESTNUT ///// BUPP^ 




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FACULTY 

12 



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FACULTY 
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FACULTY 
15 



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FACULTY 
16 



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DORMITORIES AND OFFICE 
17 



CHESTNUT "'J' DUPP^ 




DORMITORIES AND OFFICE 
18 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPP^ 



<:=> 




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SENror 



CHESTNUT "'J' DURB^ 




HAROLD FRANK 

Port Washington 



KATHERINE BENSON 

Conneaut 

President of Senior Class 

"Clarence" 



BESSIE ORT 

Coshocton 
Treasurer of Senior Class 



MRS. EMILE ELLIOiT 

Birmingham, Ala- 



MARGARET FINK 

Youngs town 

President Woman's League 

"Clarence" 



MRS. IRENE POOLE 

Mogadore 



CHESTNUT "I" DUPH-^ 




CATHERINE GIBBONS 

Cleveland 



ALVINA LEVEY 

Cleveland 



ROSE IVANDITTIE 

Cleveland 



RUTH SCHWARTZ 

Cleveland 



MARY YOHE 

Canton 



HAZEL HATHAWAY 

Elyria 
Annual Board 



CHESTNUT "I" DUPP^ 




(/ 



MURIEL SWINEHART 

Uniontown 



NELLIE HULTS 

Niles 



ISA ANDERSON 

Wellsville 



FRANCES PARKER 

Orwell 



MARYE BROWN 

Shreve 



MINNIE HACHTEL 

Dundee 



CHESTNUT "{'' DUPP^ 




ELIZABETH REIDINGER 

Kent 



ADELE ANDREWS 

Norwalk 

Decretary Woman's League 

Annual Board 

President ot Campfire 



HELEN JESSEL 

Cleveland 



FLORENCE WARREN 

Orwell - 



LUENNA HULL 

Cuyahoga Falls 



MARY McCarthy 

Lorain 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPJg^ 




HAZEL GINDLESPERGER 

West Salem 



SYLVADOR ROSENTHAL 

Cleveland 



J 



EVA O'CONNOR 

Kent 



DORIS FUSSELMAN 

Youngstown 



^ 



LENORE VETTER 

Youngstown 



HELEN HOSKIN 

Garrettsvllle 



CHESTNUT 'f{" DUPB^ 




FANNIE PARRISH 

Steubenville 



ANNA McSWEENEY 

Willard 

Business Manager Annual 

Woman's League Executive 

Board 



HELEN STULTZ 

Croton 



MINNIE STINGEL 
Sugar Creek 



MRS. JESSIE RINEHART 

Sherodsville 



DOROTHY STODDARD 

East Liverpool 



CHESTNUT "{" DURP^ 




PENELOPE HOUSTON 

^ Lowellville 



u 



HELEN HILDITCH 

Cleveland 



RUTH GELVIN 

Andover 



OLIVE STRIBLEY 

Kent 



ANNA BARTON 

Mount Vernon 



6/ 



GRACE SHARPE 

Ashtabula 
Treasurer Y. \V. C. A. 

Annual Board 
Secretary of Campfire 



CHESTNUT '"" DUPP^ 



ij 




MABEL WOLFE 

Rocktord 
Annual Board 



NELLIE AUMANN 

Delaware 

Woman's League Executive 

Board 



MABEL TROVER 

Baltic 

Editor of Annual 

Woman's League Executive 

Board 



MILDRED SCHNEGG 

Bellaire 



DOROTHY KNOX 

Sterling 

"Clarence" 

Woman's League Executive 

Board 



ANNE NOLAN 

Youngstown 
Annual Board 



CHESTNUT "{" DUPP^ 




RUTH SCOTT 

Chagrin Falls 
Secretary Y. W. C. A. 



GRACE COOK 

Fredericktown 
Secretary Senior Class 



DOROTHY SCHORLE 

Sterling 



ELIZABETH CURL 

Youngstown 



EMMA KLOHA 

Dundee 



LOVINA KELLER 
Hartville 



CHESTNUT "i" DURP^ 




ESTHER MANNS 

Obsrlin 
Cabinet Y. W. C. A. 



'■/ 



OPAL WILSON 

Warren 



IRMA BEALE 

New Amsterdam 



ADELAIDE VAN ORNUM 

West Salem 
Vice President Senior Class 



BERNICE HUTCHESON 

Salem 



C^ 



MRS. HELEN LOVE 

Cuyahoga Falls 



CHESTNUT "'J' DURP^ 




NAOMI HYLAND 

Salem 



HELEN DICKERSON 
Wadsworth 



BLANCHE KING 

Millport 



VERNA LEBOLD 

Bolivar 



CLAIRE CLINGAN 

Seattle, Wash. 



NEVA STULTZ 

Croton 



CHESTNUT "{" DURB^ 



CLASS HISTORY 

Why do we say "class history," History suggests the past, ancient 
civilization, kings, battles, and such things. But to the Seniors, our college 
days will never be of the past but of the ever living present. The whole story 
stretches out in a glorious panorama before us. 

First, w^e see ourselves as verdant young juniors, joining the rank of 
Kentonians and struggling through the mazes of those first bewildering days. 
Then we recall those w^eeks of working and playing together, which better 
than anything else make for lasting friendships. Finally, we are ready to or- 
ganize a class and take our places in Kent life. And such a life as it was! We 
see again those parties and dances which everybody thoroughly enjoyed and 
which were really such a credit to the class. Once more we thrill with pride 
over our splendid basket ball record, for our team was an "all star cast," you 
know. And whoever could forget our Junior picnic? Such food, such a 
good time, such laughter were never before seen or heard of. A wonderful 
year, and one we shall always remember with pleasure, but it is to our Senior 
days that w^e turn even more eagerly. 

In the fall of 1921 we are back again, greeting old friends and welcoming 
the new. This time it is our turn to be "Big Sisters" and make the new 
students feel at home. We hope we did our duty as well as those before us. 
Days seem just full of duties vi'hen one is a Senior. 

Of course we had constantly to be a shining example to the juniors and 
to maintain the dignity of our superior position. Did you heed, dear jun- 
iors? Were you properly impressed? 

Of minor importance, indeed, to this our highest mission, were the diffi- 
culties presented by our quest for knowledge. But vvre survived unscathed the 
snares laid for us by practice teaching. Well, w^e hope that those trials of 
learning to teach w^ere not entirely without effect in priming us to prepare the 
"young hopefuls" of America to be its future presidents and congressmen. 

On our social calendar were the usual dances, w^hich, by the way, were 
not usual at all, for our Armistice Day dance, our Christmas dance, and all the 
rest, bore a certain stamp of distinction w^hich characterizes everything under- 
taken by the class. Even more unusual was the Carnival, a red letter day in 
our class annals. 

What a host of joys to have crowded themselves into a short two years. 
And now, as the time of our commencement draws near we realize deeply 
just how short those years have been. We shall miss our friends, we shall 
miss the good times, the opportunities, and all those things that have so en- 
deared to us our school. But it is "au revoir," Kent, and not "goodbye," for 
even now^ we are eagerly awaiting the day when you will open your hands 
and your hearts to welcome us back. "Home-coming" will be for us a real 
Home-coming. 

ADELE ANDREWS. 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPB^ 



CLASS PROPHESY 



SENIOR 



'22 in '32. 

Oh! 

for a fairy barque 

to carry me 

to '32. 

Why not Henrietta Elizabeth? 

— she's my motor 

(A prosaic fairy, 

to be sure, 

but a faithful one! 

She was my fairy barque 

in '22.) 

She chugged gleefully 

when she learned 

her mission, 

and ^varned 

that my journey 

would be a long one 

Certainly! 

Ten years would scatter 

•22. 

Henri started strong 

as had '22. 

Took every hill on high, 

so had '22. 

Up, up she climbed. 

No slope too steep 

no crag too rough 

for Henri — 

nor for '22. 

We had a long trip 

and a hard one, 

Henri and I 

But we found 

what we sought for — 

'22. 

Her indomitable spirit 

is everywhere — 

in work, 

in play, 

always in success. 

We passed Kent 

the very first day. 

Kent! 

Only a milestone, 

only an achievement 

in '22. 



I wonder 

what '22 has meant to Kent. 

She has contributed 

to the art department. 

It has a building of its own. 

FLORENCE WARREN 

is on its faculty. 

There's a new dormitory, 

RUTH SWARTZ 

is matron. 

MRS. IRENE BLYTHE 

sees to the welfare 

of some 3,000 students. 

NAOMI HYLAND 

has charge in 

that white building 

on the hill. 

That's the college hospital. 

School nurses 

receive training there. 

Kent glories 

in her share 

of '22. 

I wonder 

What Ohio's share has been 

For answer 

Henri turned toward Cleveland. 

Sure enough! 

Here are two names 

that were familiar 

in '22. 

Girls who have reached 

their ambitions — 

to teach in Cleveland schools. 

FRANCES MURRAY 

I see, in the 

Superintendent's office 

with 

MRS. HELEN LOVE 

They directed me 

to the East side. 

What shall I see there, 

I wonder? 

On the way 

we passed 

HELEN STULTZ 

still personally 

interested 

in Americanization. 



CHESTNUT ///// DURR_ 



But the finest sight 

I was yet to behold 

was a bu'Iriing 

dedicated to the 

homeless children of Cleveland. 

MURIEL SWINEHART and 

DOROTHY SCHORLE 

v.ere there, giving 

money, time and self 

to these unfortunate waifs. 

The girls gave me 

a new^spaper. 

It proclaimed 

a most patriotic senator 

ADELAIDE VAN ORNUM 

using her influence 

for good 

at Washington. 

She is supported 

by a conscientious 

editor, 

MABEL TROYER 

(Remember her success 

in'22.) 

Here's an interesting ad. 

that proves 

OLIVE HACKETT'S 

ability at making things go 

in a shopper's tea room. 

I knew^ 

ANNE McSWEENEY 

couldn't be far aw^ay, 

and I found her 

managing Walter 

with as much ease 

as she had the Annual 

in '22. 

Henri was becoming 

impatient. 

She was thinking 

Cleveland had a full share 

in the glory 

of '22. 

So she transported me 

to a cozy cottage 

on the lake. 

The housewife's face 

is familiar — Oh I 

HAZEL HATHAWAY! 

what a fortunate home 

that one must be! 

She gave me news, that 

DOROTHY STODDARD 

was living, loving. 



and being happy , 

as v/as her want. 

OLIVE STRIBLEY 

had been there 

with her collegiate 

basket ball team 

(She was pretty good, 

you remember, 

in '22.) 

GRACE SHARPE 

spends her summers there 

sketching. 

The nearby village 

was enthusiastic 

about its new minister, 

and his w^ife, 

w^ho was 

HELEN DICKERSON 

in '22. 

Next stop Columbus 

and with it 

more representatives 

of '22. 

HELEN HILDITCH 

a modem Portia 

on the stand for justice. 

HELEN HOSKIN 

doing the best she can 

in the department of state. 

Ohio must appreciate Helens 

for in the department 

of physical education, 

I find the peppy one 

from the 

FirZSIMMONS LINE. 

There's 

VERNA LEBOLD 

distributing council 

from the bureau 

of education. 

On her certificate lists 

you may see 

CECILE DALLAS' name 

and 

ANNA BARTON'S. 

True to their profession 

they have spent 

their career 

spreading the spirit 

of '22. 

Now, we must leave Ohio. 

The light of '22 

shines far. 

In the south, we see 



CHESTNUT /^/// DURB^ 



BESSIE PHOENIX 

spreading the rays 

■of education 

among her kinsfolk 

in Kentucky's mountains. 

MABEL WOLFE 

gives her strength 

to the purpose 

she upheld with us 

in '22. 

NELLIE McNULTY 

has charge 

of an orphanage school 

on the gulf. 

A peep at Palm Beach! 

LENORE VETTER 

with Roy forever. 

ANNE NOLAN 

as always 

in close proximity to 

marsh and Fenn. 

DORIS FUSSELMAN 

sunny as ever, 

entertaining a crowd 

on the lawn. 

Hark! I hear a voice! 

ELIZABETH RIEDINGER'S 

to be sure — 

reproduced by Edison — 

and the gymnast 

on the beach — 

have w^e seen her before? 

Sure — it's 

EMMA KLOHE. 

Lost, Henri? See 

here's a Traveler's Aid — 

BESSIE ORT 

I declare! 

She was made 

to help people. 

She sent me to 

LEILA KIRK 

(in charge of the 

local Red Cross chapter) 

for equipment 

for a world wide search 

for '22. 

With Henri loaded 

generously 

we were off. 

This time toward Chicago 

where y/e heard 

HELEN JESSEL 

as "Carmen in 



Mary Garden's famous company. 

We stopped for water 

at a little school house 

standing alone 

on a stretch of Kansas plain — 

MINNIE STINGEL 

teaches there. 

A state farther west 

brought forth 

MILDRED SCHNEGG 

giving a settlement 

of mountaineers 

their first experience 

of Kent's project system. 

Those tw^o 

letting their lights shine 

in desert places 

as in '22. 

We spent a night 

with the shepherds 

on the slope. 

LUCILLE SHAFFER 

was there 

to make us comfortable. 

Farther up 

amidst the most beautiful 

scenery 

we caught 

NELLE AUMANN 

with easel and palette 

putting the finishing touches 

to her masterpiece. 

Summer camps 

are always interesting. 

In one 

FANNIE PARRISH 

was arranging the diet 

for invalid guests. 

EVA O'CONNOR 

had a class of heavyweights 

on the lawn 

directing them 

by her own system 

of reducing. 

They were accompanied 

by an orchestra. 

RUTH GELVIN 

conducting, with 

ISA ANDEF^SON 

bowing her leading fiddle. 

They told me that 

HAZEL GINDLESPERGER 

wrote their music. 

In the evening 



CHESTNUT "{" DURP^ 



the guests gathered 

to hear a worthy lecture by 

ESTELLE LOTZE 

Her subject related 

to Agriculture. 

We thought 

a run into Mexico 

might be profitable, 

and indeed it was. 

CLAIRE CLINGAN 

had established 

a fresh air school 

in Mexico City 

for over a thousand children. 

LOVINA KELLER 

was her right hand helper. 

Another day 

found Henri and me writh 

PENELOPE HOUSTON 

in Los Angeles. 

She's a press correspondent 

and publicity agent for 

NEVA STULTZ 

De Mille's latest star. 

She told me 

I would find 

BLANCHE KING 

along the beach somewhere, 

either swimming 

or reading "Vogue" and 

munching chocolates. 

NELLIE HULTZ 

is the comedian 

for the whole colony. 

The Steamer! 
The first day out 
unearthed 

MARGARET FINK 
traveling in the interest 
of the Woman's League. 
She proved a genial 
companion, 
as did another lady 
on board, 
ETHEL PERKINS, 
the deck nurse. 

We stopped at Hawaii. 
The first American school 
we saw, echoed 
MINNIE HATCHEL 
and '22. 



RUTH SCOTT 

came aboard. 

She is a foreign director 

of our Y. W. C. A. 

While the ship docked 

at Hongkong, 

we visited 

HELEN HOPKINS, 

struggling with a 

native mission school. 

PEARL DUTT 

ministered to our fever 

at Manilla. 

She is the chief M. D. 

on the islands. 

A run over to India 

revealed 

OPAL WILSON 

occupied with 

missionary teaching. 

We almost missed 

Australia 

but '22 called us 

from a school of dramatic art 

where 

DOROTHY KNOX 

holds forth. 

The shores of Africa 

looked formidable, 

but the interior 

opened the secret to 

ALVINA LEVEY'S future 

as a collector 

and distributor of diamonds. 

In Morocco 

We spent a night with 

KATE BENSON. 

(We knew in '22 

she was made for a president 

and she's it 

at a University there.) 

ADELE ANDREWS 

served v^^ith her 

as dean of wromen, 

radiating her charm 

and grace 

throughout the whole school. 

Lavin in Paris, 

introduced 

his most successful model 

MARYE BROWN, of '22. 

Even starving Russia 

harbors two 

of our noble sisters. 



CHESTNUT ///// DURB^ 



MRS. EMILIE ELLIOTT and 

ROSE IVANDITTIE. 

American dollars 

are helping them 

relieve suffering 

in thousands of 

sick minds and bodies. 

At London 

MARY YOHE 

met us, with her husband, 

the American Ambassador. 

They came home 

for the inauguration. 

On deck, one day, 

we came upon . . 

NELLIE SMITH 

traveling companion 

to an amiable lady 

w^hose granddaughter 

was aboard 

with her governess, 

MARY McCarthy. 

At the Metropolis 

w^e saw^ 

"The Follies of 1932." 

GRACE COOKE starred! 

In the crowd 



LUEENA HULL 

hailed us, 

with information 

that she directed 

literary activities 

at Vassar. 

A book-dealer's sign 

caught our eye — 

ELIZABETH CURL! 

At the reviewer's desk sat 

MRS. JESSIE RHINEHEART 

And in the window 

the season's 

most successful book 

claimed 

MARION TROTTER 

as its author. 

Now for Washington! 

The procession has begun. 

Who is the very stately 

matron 

by the side 

of the new President? 

ESTHER MANNS? 

A First Lady! 

'22 is represented 

in the White House! 



CHESTNUT "{" DUPP^ 




L-y 



(jLrNior§ 



CHESTNUT "f" DUPB^ 




JUNIORS 
38 



CHESTNUT "(i' BUPB^ 




JUNIORS 
39 



CHESTNUT "(" DUPP^ 




JUNIORS 
40 



CHESTNUT "(" DUPg^ 







JUNIORS 
41 



CHESTNUT "I" DUPB^ 




CHESTNUT ///// DURH^ 




CHE STNUT "fjf DURP^ 



JUNIORS 



Annis, Marguerite 
Armstrong, Flossie F. 
Arnliolt, Albert H. 
Aten, Mildred E. 
Atzberger, Nellie M. 
Baker, Ruth E. 
Behm, Zila A. 
Beninghot, Marcia M. 
Berg, Pauline 
Bissell, Mary C. 
Blackstone. Leona 
Bower, Ona 
Brewster, Eunice 
Brown, Hanna 
Brown, Lucena 
Brown, Velnia 
Bucher, Elizabeth 
Burch, Dorothy 
Burket, Margaret 
Byrnes, Blanche 
Cannon, Muriel 
Carlson, Ruth 
Carter, Juva 
Chain, Julia 
Chandler, Isobel 
Channon, Grace 
Chapman. Alice 
Clark, Frances 
Clevenger, Christine 
Clevenger, Jennie 
Cole, Cletus 
Cole, Wilbur 
Conner, Marguerite 
Conrad, Frances 
Cook, Clarence LeRoy 
Cook, Ethel 
Coomer, Lucile 
Cooper, Catherine 
Corbett, Elizabeth 
Crawford, Inez 
Creighton, Harvey 
Crowe, Nelson 
Cutter, Ruth 
Denney, Beulah 
Dexter, Venus 
Dick, Edithe 
Dickerhoff, Leota 
Dingman, Ruth 
Dunlap, Birdie 
Dunlap, Hattie 
Dunn, Dorothea 
Dzunda, Martha 
Elk, Christine 
Evans, Lota A. 
Fenton, Katherine 
Fish, Dorothy 
Fitzsimmons, Helen 
Fligle, Myrtle 
Fox, Iva 
France. Zana 
Ganyard, Eunice 
Gates, Mrs. Fern 
Glass, R. Camille 
Goddard, Inez 
Greenfield, Verlan 
Gruver, Ella 
Hamley, Katherine 



Hansen, Gerda Tranberg 
Hardy, Leslie 
Harlan, Blanche 
Hart, Lucy 
Hartenstein, Jean 
Hartman. Bessie 
Haynes, Elsie 
Heiser, Mabelle 
Henry. Helen 
Hetrick, Sylvia 
Hirschman, Emma 
Hoffman, Helen 
Hogan, Annette 
Hogle, Julia E. 
Hopkins, Helen 
Horkey, Hilda 
Horton, Glen Forest 
Hunter, Alestha 
Hunter, Christine 
Jones, May 
Jones, Elizabeth 
Jones, Ruth 
Joseph, Leo 
Kahl, Dorothy 
Kaifer. Mary Thelma 
Kepler. Fern 
Kibler, Lucile 
King, Maude L. 
Klein, Florence 
Klingensmith, Edna 
Koester, Hilmer 
Kuhn, Oliver 
LaDow, Wanda 
Lanese, Anna 
Lappin, Mrs. Georgia 
Lawrence, Marion 
Leach, Doris 
Leavengood. Carrie 
Leavengood, Manilla 
Lehet, Edna 
Leimbach. Elma 
Leslie, Doris 
Lewis, Anne 
Litman, Lina 
Luxon, Vera 
McCune, Vernice 
McCutcheon, Margaret 
Mclntire, Althea 
Marett, Cecil 
Marquis, Mary 
Meacham, Grace 
Metts, Mrs. Mary 
Miller, LaRue 
Miller, Odessa 
Moores, Grace 
Murlin, Jason 
Myers. Amanda 
Newmeyer, Paul 
Nuhn, Mildred 
Ort, Frances 
Ott, Frances Ortha 
Peacock, Katherine 
Peterson, Mrs. Lurlin 
Foley, Lydia 
Potter, Lydia 
Proehl, Thelma 
Pulver, Hilda M. 

44 



Ramsayer, Ilene 
Reed, Frances 
Reidenbach, Ruby 
Repac, Tressa 
Kiley, Mary 
Rodhe, Altha 
Romig, Mrs. Mildred 
Rowe, Carrie 
Sadler, Anna Marie 
Sarbach, Harriett 
Schnegg, Helen 
Schneider, Elden 
Seymour, Kathryn 
Shafer, Lucile 
Shaffer, Vera 
Sharpe, Lucille 
Shook, Glenn 
Sickafoose, Geo. 
Sigler, Alice 
Smedley, Goldie 
Smith, Fern 
Smith, Helen 
Smith, Nelle 
Snyder, Ruth 
Stopher, Mrs. Helen 
Storey, Mildred 
Stranahan, 11a Marie 
Stump. Zelda 
Summers, Mrs. Grace 
Swift, Hazel 
Thomas, Mary 
Thompson, Gladys 
Tice, Mary 
Tompkins, Evelyn 
Truog, V. Annabel 
Tryon, Blanche 
Vogel, Marie 
Wadsworth. Florence 
Waldele, Doris 
Warren, Bertha 
Weston, Dorothy 
Williams, Mary 
Williamson, Valda 
York. Mrs. Bessie 
Ziegler, Blooma 
Shaffter, Susie 
Buehler, Lauretta 
Ewing, Arline 
Heakin, Margaret 
Hoskin, Florence 
Knapp, Alice 
Plechaty, Eleanor 
Riedinger. Lucille 
Schaffter, Susie 
Blocher. Edna 
Hileman. Fern 
Meyer, Edith 
Hoskin, Lucille 
Noirot, Viola 
O'Connor, Rosetta 
Owen, Margaret 
Shattuck. Marjorie 
Secor, Mary 
Cole, Marguerite 
Carroll, Gertrude 
Ladd, Helen 
Lvon, Gertrude 



CHESTNUT ///^/ DURP^ 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 



Did you walk by the Music Room of Moulton Hall on November 1 8, 
1 92 I ? If you did, I'm sure you heard the music of an orchestra, the subdued 
talk and laughter of many voices and saw the beaming smiles on the faces of 
both students and faculty. I'm also sure that you knew at once that it was a 
dance given by the Junior Class of 1921. This was the first dance we had 
given and it w^as here we were recognized by all as an organized class. It 
soon became known that the members of the Junior Class worked together 
for the good of each other, the class as a whole, and the college. 

Now, I v,'ant to ask another question. Have you ever visited any of the 
Junior class rooms during recitation periods and heard the answers that the 
Juniors give and the intelligent questions they ask? If you have, I know you 
will join with the members of the faculty and student body in saying that the 
Juniors hold their own, not only in social events, but in class work as well. 

Now^, the third question is. Did you ever see the Junior basket ball team 
play? Did you notice the pass w^ork, the accuracy of the shots, and the in- 
spiring manner in which the team was backed by the entire class? Did you 
hear the husky "Team Rah! " which came from the throats of the Juniors? 
This is the proof that the Juniors are certainly not lacking in athletics and have 
a good supply of pep. 

After reading these accounts of our activities, you no doubt think that 
the Junior class of '2 1 is one of the best classes that has ever been enrolled in 
K. S. N. C. You are right! It is to us, at least, the very best class that has 
been enrolled in any school. Now^, I will try to tell you the names of those 
who have helped to make this one of the foremost classes of the college. 

Mr. Ivins is our faculty advisor and it is he who has guided us through 
the difficulties that surround every college class. We all v/ish to thank him 
for his guidance and help. Miss Dunbar, our librarian, has been ready al- 
ways to help us in our reference v^rork and study, and we thank her for her aid 
while we were yet new to the life of a college student. We also would like to 
thank all of our instructors who have taught us many things that will be of great 
use to us in our later lives. 

The last thing we have to say is: We're glad that we came to Kent State 
Normal College and hope that w^e may all be back next year with a bigger love 
than ever for the entire school in our hearts. Rah! Rah! 

CHRISTINE CLEVENGER, '23. 



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K. S. N. C. 
God gave all men all earth to love, 
But since our hearts are small, 
Ordained for each one spot should prove 
Beloved over all. 

—KIPLING. 



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COLLEGE SENIORS 



ANSALEM COBBS 

Columbiana 



ELLA E. MOON 

Cleveland 



JAMES A. ZINGERY 
Kent 



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COLLEGE JUNIORS 



ALICE BEANE 

East Liverpool 



LAURAMARIE WEGMAN 

Kent 



HERBERT W. WALTER 

Kent 



MILDRED COOK 

Kent 



RICHARD F. CAIN 

Clarington 



HAZEL HEWITT 

Newton Falls 



ADELIA NEWHOUSE 

Clarington 



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SOPHOMORES 
50 



/\ 



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^&§ 




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SNAPS 
53 



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COLLEGE STUDENTS 1 92 1 



FRESHMAN 

Babb, Helen 
Basey, Mildred M. 
Beckwith, David G. 
Bletz, Kethryn H. 
Blackstone, Leona M. 
Bryant, Helen 
Card, Ruby 
Carnahan, Louis E. 
Casey, Oren 
Chapman, Gerald 
Christie, G. F. 
Cowdrey, Gladys May 
Cora, Albert M. 
Crow, Harvey J. 
Dick, Edythe Hillis 
Dorrance, Wni. Lloyd 
Dunn, Clifton K. 
Evans, Howard 
Ferro, Rosa M. 
Folger, Kenneth L. 
Garman, Vida C. 
Gerren, Clarence 
Gibson, Russel C. 
Graham, Aneta A. 
Hahn, Walter A. 
Halliwell, Dorris L. 
Hanson, Arthur S. 
Hibbard, L. D. 
Keith, Hazel Mae 
Kingsley. Kenneth E. 
Kulow, Marie F. 
Liddle, Mary E. 
Line, Smith H. 
McCaughey, Benj. W. 
McCracken, Dorothy M. 
Mathias, Wilbert E. 
Overholt, Ward H. 
Ovington, Genevieve 
Renouf, C. R. 
Rogers, Ralph 
Russell, Marsaret 
Sabin, Howard L. 
Scott, Ellen L. 
Sheets, Earl 0. 
Shepherd, Howard E. 
Spangler, Paul L. 
Smith, Florence E. 
Spinneweber, Harriet 
Staples, Eleanor W. 
Stewart, Margaret E. 
Stoudt, Phoebe M. 
Sturgill, Leonard F. 
Swartz, John M. 



Tait, Marv E. 
Terrill, Ruth M. 
Tripcony, Helen 
Tuttle, Marian C. 
Van Wye, Josephine M. 
Weiss, Beulah 
Zappolo, Fred 
Snyder, Ed. 
Bryan, Willard 
Cain, Carroll 
Schodorf, Gladys 
Biltz, Leon 
Brown, E. R. 
Cook, C. LeRoy 
Durbin, Justin 
Hahn, Carl 
Hardy, Leslie 
Lash, Arthur 
Luxon, Harold 
Saine, Floyd 
Sickafoose, George 
Joseph, Leo 
Horton, Glenn 
Carlozzi, Pat 
Elker, Leroy 
Soma, Edward 
Abbott, Carl 
Dille, Everlin 
Hargett, Wm. 
Robson, Henry 
Schweigert, John 
Simon, Philip 
Joyce, Ann 

SOPHOMORE 

Corp, Frank C. 
Critz, Florence 
Dutt, Pearl H 
Evans, Edwin 
Hawn, Margaret H, 
Kennedy, Lyle G. 
Koontz, Carl 
Love, Mary 
Rausch, Calvin 
Terry, Zelda 
Tryon, H. W. 
Walker, Esther 
Wattleworth, Esther 
Wingerd, Harriet 
Yeo, Burgett 
Hostetler, Roy 
Morris, Vera 
Moore, Frank 



CHESTNUT ///// DUREL^ 



COLLEGE CLASS 

Among the various organizations of K. S. N. C. in 1 922, the Col- 
lege Section is the largest, with the most vim and "pep." Whatever 
the College Section, w^ith its equal division of "co-eds" undertakes, it 
is certain to achieve success. It is the College Section which furnishes 
our basket ball stars, our cheer leaders, our football stars, and our 
most enthusiastic "rooters." Enjoyable parties during the year have 
proved the class to be cordial and hospitable. Not only does the sec- 
tion boast of athletic and social leaders, but also dramatic ability as 
was shown in "Clarence," Five out of the ten members of the cast 
for this play w^ere college students. 



Physics, civics, biology and "lab", 
Chemistry, French and math'matical fad, 
"Library silence" and Prexy's talks formal — 
Enough to stump old Socrates — 
We down 'em all and yell like mad 
For our old college, Kent State Normal. 

HELEN BRYANT, '25. 



CHESTNUT "('' DUPP^ 



THE BEECH GROVE 

I know a little beech grove that grows beside a river, 
A-leaning o'er the river to see itself below; 
it bends above the water with slender leaves a-quiver, 
It croons across the water a song I used to know. 

I found it in October, when half its leaves had fallen. 
And half v^^ere still a-rustle, startled by the frost. 
And through the years between us today I heard it calling 
The tune I still remember, though all the v^^ords are lost. 

HEWITT, '23. 



MUSIC 

1 am the magic key that can unlock 

The soul's deep anguish, hidden ne'er so well; 

I am the quiet of the hermit's cell. 

The whispering wave, the elemental shock 

Of torrent meeting torrent; I can rock 

The Soul's foundations till a gaping hell 

Yawns round it, or in sylvan accents tell 

Of love-lorn shepherd piping to his flock. 

All w^ords of human utterance are mine; 

All formless thoughts that rise within the heart 

I can upgalher into drops like wine. 

And by the potent magic of my art 

Mingle their essence in a draught divine. 

To gods and men strange madness to impart. 



HEWITT, '23. 



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THE ANNUAL BOARD 
57 



CHESTNUT "(" DUPR^ 



EDITORIAL 

As an introduction to the Chestnut Burr, the editor hopes to set forth in 
these brief sentences some of the ideals to be attained by this class of 1922, 
as well as the school which they represent. 

Before and since the great World War the leading nations of the earth 
have been groping about as if yet in doubt as to the real source of power and 
greatness. They have exploited wealth and commerce and expansion of ter- 
ritory and of armies and of navies, and yet they cry out as if in despair. Many 
look to the idealists of America for help and yet even here we have spent mil- 
lions in hopeless projects. So hopeless, moreover, seems our help from ma- 
terialism that America for one has volunteered to confess to the world that 
not by power nor by might but by another spirit is our strength. The invita- 
tion w^as given, and the response was "The Disarmament Conference" at Wash- 
ington, the results of which only the future will know^. But at any rate it seems 
to be the beginning of a new diplomacy. From whence did it come? From 
the spirit in which our nation was bom and reared. To promulgate it is our 
greatest task and our school system our greatest opportunity. 

Recently our ambassador at the Court of St. James said, "The strength 
of a country is not measured by armies and navies. A school-house at the 
cross-roads is more potent than a dreadnaught on the seas. One little church 
on the hill is worth a score of regiments." 

This utterance proclaims an American ideal. To the home, the church, 
and the public schools we must look to maintain it. To further this end the 
State of Ohio is not the least among the states of our union in her efforts. 
That the education of her citizens may become more uniform and general, by 
an act of the General Assembly, approved May 19, 1910, two new normal 
schools were established. One of these is now known as Kent State Normal 
College. Through her efficient faculty her growth and influence has been 
constant. 

It is the hope of the editor that every member of the class of 1922 may 
reflect credit upon this institution and meet successfully the ever increasing 
responsibilities and opportunities of life. The American teachers are no lon- 
ger incidental factors in the development of the lives of our boys and girls, 
they are the managers of "the laboratories of citizenship." Let us honor our 
high calling by our worthiest efforts. 

EDITOR. 



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MOULTON HALL 

The weekly House Meetings of the Hall have brought about a 
friendly co-operation between our Head Resident, Mrs. Bourne, and 
the Moulton Hall girls. 

By w^ay of fun it w^as agreed at the first of the year that each floor 
should entertain the other tw^o floors in turn. The third floor led 
w^ith an entertainment that far surpassed any circus we have ever seen. 
The second and first floors follow^ed with equally amusing entertain- 
ments that sent us to bed shrieking w^ith laughter. 

Our Christmas party put the Christmas spirit into us so firmly, 
that it lasted throughout the Christmas vacation. 

Home-coming w^as the time for enjoying many "feeds" and va- 
rious other forms of merry-making for all. 

It is w^ith a feeling of deep vacuity around the regions of our 
hearts, that we give Moulton Hall up to the coming class. Mrs. 
Bourne has mingled w^ith us in such a motherly way that our love and 
respect for her have grown month by month. 

It is to be hoped that the Moulton Hall girls of the future will 
enjoy their home as much as we have enjoyed it. 



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LOWRY HALL 

Bewildered, homesick girls, striving desperately to keep back the tears, 
we met in Lowry Hall in mid-September. In prim silence we entered the 
dining-room, and used our knives and forks with such exquisite manners as 
Lowry Hall will not witness again until next September. 

The bulletin-board announced house-meeting. The mysterious house 
rules of which we had heard so much were to be revealed. We gathered in 
silent politeness, and listened attentively throughout the meeting. After the 
meeting, each corridor elected proctors with never-to-be-repeated seriousness. 

While yet quite young, w^e attended the "get-acquainted" Lowry Kid 
Party. Sweet little girls of the present mingled in noisy joyousness with quaint 
little maidens from the Land of Story Books. 

Times soon changed. There were no more struggles with forgotten com- 
binations, no more tears of homesickness, no more untasted meals, no more 
quiet halls, but, instead, doors hospitably open, hilarious laughter, girls "simply 
starved," and busy corridors. 

Thanksgiving arrived with the excitement of getting off. But vacation 
had scarcely begun when the lure of Lowry claimed us, and a lonesome feeling 
told us that we would be glad to return. 

Busy days followed. All those pongee handkerchiefs to finish in the next 
three weeks! Exams, were upon us, and the long-neglected, almost forgotten 
note-books were due! Eleven, twelve o'clock, and the lights still gleamed 
through almost every door! 

Rumors abroad! Santa Claus is coming to Lowry! The designated 
time arrived. The musical clang of the hall-bell called us together about the 
tree, and Santy distributed gifts while we munched pop-corn and sang songs. 
Weren't we happy? Oh! ! ! 

Two whole weeks without seeing the girls! We half regretted the ar- 
rival of the long looked for vacation. 

The winter term began. We had all resolved to study much harder. We 
began at once by having parties and spreads in unheard of numbers. 

Of course we love Lowry! Who wouldn't? Each day it becomes dearer 
dearer to us. We loathe to think of the parting. As we are working, 
playing, studying, we are making friends, who are more lasting than the most 
carefully prepared lessons. 



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FOYER— MOULTON HALL 




DINING ROOM— LOWRY HALL 



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OFF-CAMPUS 

The live wire group of the school is the big one that includes every student who does 
not live in the dormitories. This is the first college year that the off-campus group has 
included every off-campus student. Heretofore membership had been restricted to "ladies 
only." This year's adventure has proven beyond all shadow of a doubt that the inclusion 
of men students has strengthened the organization. At any rate, whether the cause be 
the men, the enthusiastic president, or Mr. Manchester, this year's off-campus organiza- 
tion has commanded attention and gotten it. 

To begin at the beginning. When about one hundred and fifty prospective students 
arrived at Kent last September, they found the dormitory doors closed. All Kent's homes 
were open, however, and the householders received the students gratefully. It is this 
group of students who came together during the second week of school and organized into 
an off-campus section. From the moment the officers took their places, things began to 
hum. Mr. Manchester was chosen faculty advisor and helped along with the good work. 

The group practiced the school yells and songs, and showed the rest of the school 
how to yell and sing with the hope that their exhibition would instill a bit more pep into 
the student body. At one assembly meeting, just before the game with Bowling Green, 
the off-campus section gave the team boys a heap of encouragement to the tune of "Auld 
Lang Syne." Miss Ott, our president, composed the words. 

"We're with you, boys, we're with you, boys, 

We're with you in this fight. 

We know you'll win, we know you'll win, 

So play with all your might. 

We can't be there, we're sorry, too, 

But. we know what you'll do. 

You've got the pep, you've got the pep. 

So play the old game through. 

And while you play just think of us. 

For we're from off-campus. 

We're right behind you every game 

To wish you luck and fame. 

And once again we'll say to you 

We're with you in this fight. 

We know you'll win, we know you'll win, 

So play with all your might. 

The boys liked it; at least they said they did. 

Everyone remembers the party the off-campus section gave late in October. There 
were more students present that night than for any other school function of the term. 

The men's section have made themselves felt as an individual group in their Men's 
Club. We're glad for the Men's Club. Their parties and dances and minstrel shows are 
worthy of them. Their athletes speak well for Kent. 

The girls' ranks produce some athletes too. It's a little early in the year to have 
heard definitely from them, but they're ready to be noticed. Practices indicate that the 
off-campus girls' basket ball team will be the strongest on the floor. 

So you see that much has come from the group of scattered students whose only 
means of getting together is their section organization. It is to be hoped that the 
strength of this year's group will be a heritage to coming college years. At least it may 
leave its motto, "We're with you." 

66 



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WOMAN'S LEAGUE 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Margaret Fink President 

Anne Lewis Vice-President 

Adele Andrews Secretary 

Marie Kulow^ Treasurer 

Zelda Terry College Class 

Pearl Dutt College Class 

Mabel Troyer Senior Class 

Anna McSw^eeney Senior Class 

Elizabeth Bucker Junior Class 

Florence Critz Household Arts 

Mildred Cooke OfF-Campus 

Dorothy Knox Moulton Hall 

Mabel Wolf Lowry Hall 

Grace Sharpe Y. W. C. A. 

Nelle Auman Art Department 

Gladys Thompson Special Music 

Miss Bayliss Adviser 

63 



CHESTNUT "i" DURB^ 



THE WOMAN'S LEAGUE 

The Woman's League of Kent State Normal College was organized in 
1915 and has grown rapidly each year until now it is the largest organization 
and most energetic force in regulating the affairs and activities of the women 
students at Kent. 

One of the activities which the League fostered and which will stand out 
in the minds of the woman students and faculty members as one of the enjoyed 
events of the year, was the Big Sister Tea held November 22 in the music room 
at Mculton Hall. The Big Sisters acted as hostesses to their little sisters. The 
hour before the program was very enjoyably spent in getting acquainted. The 
program which was given by some of the talented members of the League was 
followed by the serving of tea. 

Another notable event of the Fall term was the special Christmas program 
given by the Women's League in assembly. Several readings were given and 
Christmas stories told. These were followed by a one act play, "The Travel- 
ing Man," which was well staged by three students in the Reading class under 
the supervision of Miss Davis. 

In the Winter quarter another special assembly was given in which the 
Executive Board in behalf of the Woman's League presented the physical 
education department with a fine set of scales. The program consisted of 
several health speeches and a song given by the members of the Executive 
Board. The scales were graciously received by Miss Hyde who acknowledged 
a need for them in her department. 

During home-coming the Executive Board of the Woman's League sold 
college colors. Everyone wore these colors in token of loyalty to Kent State 
Normal College. 

In May the Woman's League planted and dedicated a tree to John Bur- 
roughs. This is the third tree that has been planted in the Woman's League 
row between Moulton and Lowry Halls. 

The mid-spring students were welcomed by a party. This affair was 
well attended by the old students who immediately undertook the responsibil- 
ity of being hostesses and making the new girls feel welcome. 

The accomplishment and development of all the plans and activities of 
this organization are due to Miss Bayliss who has been a thoughtful adviser to 
the Executive Board of the Woman's League and a good counsellor concern- 
ing the welfare of all the women of the college. 



CHESTNUT "I'i DUPB^ 




Y. W. C. A. 



CABINET 

President Vera Carson 

Vice-President Alice Beane 

Secretary Ruth Scott 

Treasurer Grace Sharpe 

Program Esther Manns, Lucille Sharpe 

Social Service Katherine Hamley 

Recreation Margaret Stuart 

Bible Study Florence Critz 

Publicity Mildred Schnegg 

Social Dorothy Stoddard 

Membership Esther Walker 

Under graduate representative . . Alice Beane 
Adviser Miss Davis 

70 



CHESTNUT "(" DUPP^ 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. in Kent State Normal College is getting well 
enough established to have traditions. The fall term get-acquainted 
part}', the bazaar, and the mid-winter colonial party are regular annual 
affairs looked forward to by the entire student body. Each one of these 
enterprizes in 1921-22 was a well-defined success. But these social 
affairs are not the backbone of the Y. W. C. A. The thing of which 
the Association is most proud is the regular Sunday evening service. 
This year the meetings have proved unusually profitable. Dur- 
ing the winter quarter the general topic of "The Student and His 
Bible" was made the special theme for each meeting. Among the 
speakers were Mr. Crowe and Mr. Dorrance, college students. Super- 
intendent W. A. Walls, Mr. Stopher, Miss Prentice, and Miss Davis, 
the Y. W. adviser. 

The Y. W. is also proud of the fact that through its efforts over 
one hundred dollars was contributed by the college, students and fac- 
ulty, to the European Student Relief fund. 

The Y. W. C. A. is not as w^ell organized along certain Associa- 
tion lines as we wish that it were, but we are growing and becoming 
each year a more definite part of the vital life of the college. 



CHESTNUT "{" DUPR^ 




SPECIAL MUSIC STUDENTS 
MUSIC 

You've met these girls before. They were introduced by name 
early last fall when nearly every assembly brought some announce- 
ment for the "special music girls. " Since then you have met them 
often separately and as a group, in connection with the music mem- 
ory contest. This contest was in the nature of a term project for 
them, correlated w^ith regular classroom v/ork in piano, voice, har- 
mony, theory, appreciation, and methods. No group in the school has 
been more actively "doing something" all year, than has this group. 
1 heir measure of success w^ill be exhibited even before the Chestnut 
Burr has come from the press — in the annual recital in the spring. 

It is appropriate that in the picture the supervisors' class should be 
grouped around Miss Shamel and Miss Bachman, who have made the 
center of their activities for the year. Miss Bachman, at the piano, 
has supervised the girls in the training school; Miss Shamel (behind 

72 



CHESTNUT ///// BURP^ 



her) has been the instructor in the college subjects. Reading from 
the left the girls are Eva O'Connor, Mrs. Poole, Gladys Thompson, 
Elizabeth L. Reidinger, Miss Shamel, Blanche King, Helen Ladd, and 
Anna Sadler. 

The school orchestra, organized and directed by Miss Shamel, 
consists of twenty players. It made its first appearance before the 
student body in assembly on the 1 6th of February. Its second ap- 
pearance was made Februarj' 23rd, on home-coming day, before the 
student body, training school, and visitors. It has outgrow^n the first 
collection of music and is now^ working on a more difficult collection. 
Its appearance before the school always brings forth the heartiest of ap- 
plause. 

The Training School under this department, with Miss Ora Belle 
Bachman as director, has presented programs at the college assembly. 
At Christmas the High School Glee Club gave two numbers. The 
fifth, third, sixth and first grades have given programs at different 
times and the Junior High boys have lead the college in mass singing. 
At another time the entire Junior High gave a program. 

The last w^eek in May was really the best week of the year for the 
music department. An interesting recital was given, the voice and 
piano students being assisted by the elementary school, the high 
school glee club, and the men's and women's glee clubs of the college. 
Altogether this has been a big year for the music department. 




CHESTNUT "{" DUPB^ 




SPECIAL ART CLASS 




SPECIAL ART CLASS— WEAVING 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPP^ 



ART DEPARTMENT 

Do you want to Wear about the art department? Perhaps you do not 

know that you can specialize just think what it means — in art at Kent State 

Normal. There are ten students specializing this year, six who ■will graduate 
in June. 

There are six courses offered, none of w^hich you w^ould want to niiss- 
In Drawing 1 1, the students learn to draw what the children will enjoy most 
and also those projects that are suitable for each grade. 

In Designing or Drawing 2 1 , the students learn to use originality and in- 
genuity. Everyone likes to make something which no one has ever thought 
of before. You are always given that privilege. During this year the girls 
have made velvet table runners, pillow tops, and sanitas mats. But th^t is not 
all. Almost every girl has a table lamp in her room and v^fants a pretty shade 
on it. Parchment shades, therefore, were made for the lamps, any design de- 
sired being used. 

Everyone is anxious to take Drawing 12, or handwork. In this course 
hammocks, doll tarn o'shanters, bonnets, hats and sweaters, memory books, 
memorandum pads, hand sew^ed books, reed baskets, v^riting cases, and many 
other things are made. 

It is exciting as well as interesting to see vi^hat can be made with a piece 
of charcoal and an eraser. In the translations of nature, the trees really 
seemed to sway in the v^^ind. The students sketched not only nature but the 
different members of their class as well. 

This drawing is done in the free hand class. 

I wonder how many of you could name some of the great artists and 
identify at least five of their w^orks. Study of this kind is taken up in art ap- 
preciation, or Drawing 26. 

But I have one more thing I should like to tell you about. In order to 
tell you so that you will understand, 1 must take you up to the weaving room. 
Sh! walk quietly! Listen! hear that beating sound? The loom makes that 
noise. There are three looms, two small ones and one large one. As you 
see, there are only two girls working now. The other girl just went to class. 
As the bell (to go to class) rang, she said: "I don't want to go; I would much 
rather stay here and weave." It you think the girls do not enojy it, you 
should see them work outside of class time. On the wall you see the rugs 
which the girls have made. They are real ones, and will wear a long time. 
On the small looms, the girls make pillow tops, dresser scarfs, bags, and other 
articles that are finer than the rugs. Weaving is not all that the girls learn. 
They study the different kinds of cloth, something practical as well as inter- 
esting. 

Don't you think this course is worth your consideration? Wouldn't you 
like to specialize in it? Don't miss the opportunity. 

75 



CHESTNUT "i'i BURR_. 



THE PASSING OF THE RAIL FENCE 

Grandfather Parker gave a glance which took in every corner of the 
room, then he slipped cautiously outside. There was no one in sight. Sue, 
that was John's wife, had gone down the road to the ladies' meeting at Craw- 
ford's. John was somewhere about, but he was not to be seen. 

Grandfather slipped across the lawn, and out the back way through the 
orchard. His fear that John might see him occasioned those stealthy glances 
behind and to either side of him. It was growing dusk now, and there were 
hosts of shadows playing about among the rows of trees. Grandfather started 
at one and another of them, fearfully. What if John should be there, and 
should see? 

Through the soft languor of a spring-time dusk Grandfather hastened 
along. His step w^as somewhat halting and uneven. Grandfather wras very 
old. He w^as w^eary and w^ornout, and there was a sharp ache in his back and 
in his bowed shoulders even before he had reached the edge of the pasture. 
Nevertheless, as he stopped there, and leaned his weight against the old chest- 
nut tree, his shoulders seemed to straighten, and his head to lift. 

A long, gently-sloping stretch of lovely green pasture land unfolded be- 
fore his eyes. A peaceful, velvet sort of thing that seemed to be fused into 
the dusk somewhere out there. The sight of it made Grandfather want to 
straighten up, and to breathe with all his feeble strength the youth and the 
magic in the fresh spring air. 

Then he remembered. He had not come for such a purpose; he had 
not even thought of such a thing. Grandfather had come to make a little 
pilgrimaee, a sacred journey. He had come to view^ the last remnant of the 
old rail fence. 

John had said it must go, and had given a long list of reasons, reasons 
quite logical and obvious enough, even Grandfather admitted. The old man 
had sat still, saying nothing, but with a vk^hole train of thought trooping through 
his mind. In the days that follovs^ed he had listened to talk of it, and of the 
progress which was being made in the work. From their talking he knew that 
the last bit would go tomorrow. 

Grandfather gazed at it — a few yards of the time-worn, weather-beaten, 
blackened rail fence. There was a dimness more dim than that of age in his 
eyes. For a long time he stood thus, his gaze riveted upon that pitiful, pic- 
turesque little remnant of other days. With a half-unconscious sigh he bowed 
his head, then turned his halting footsteps toward the orchard path again. 

JULIA CHAIN. 







CHESTNUT "i" DUPP^ 



DEBATE 




CHESTNUT '"/' DUPH^ 




BLUE AND GOLD DEBATING TEAM 



CHESTNUT 'f(" DURB^ 



THE BLUE AND GOLD DEBATING CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Burgett E. Yeo, Ravenna President 

Ward H. Overholt, Kent Vice-President 

Richard F. Cain, Clarington Secretary 

Harvey E. Crow, Beach City Asst. Secretary 

Fred Zappolo, Macedonia Treasurer 

ROLL 



Richard F. Cain Monroe County 

Oren Casey Coshocton County 

Harvey Crow Stark County 

Clifton Dunn Ashtabula County 

Ward H. Overholt Portage County 

Burgett E. Yeo Portage County 

Fred Zappolo Summit County 

James A. Zingery Tuscarawas County 

G. F. Christie Trumbull County 

E. E. Schneider Stark County 

Jason C. Murlin Portage County 

George Fordney Jefferson County, Pa. 

(The first eight were charter members.) 



HISTORY OF CLUB 



"To promote organized debating, good fellowship and the proper school 
spirit among the men of Kent State Normal College," the Blue and Gold De- 
bating Club was organized. Stated bi-monthly and numerous special meetings 
were held in which developed interestng floor discussions and debates. 

"To rest is to ru.st ' w^as the club's motto and President Yeo w^ore the his- 
toric gavel flat on either end. "Dick" Cain declared the club would have to 
provide new leads for his Eversharp or he could not afford to continue writing 
voluminous minutes of the activities. Treasurer Zappolo made a splendid 
record for thoroughness, promptness, and doing the right thing at the right 
time. Casey, Crow^, Overholt, and Murlin were always ready for a battle of 
words and "sure enjoyed" bombarding the enemy. Mr. Zingery's insistance 
on "Keep the ball rolling"; Dunn's belief that a joke now and then helps the 
world along; Schneider's dramatic talent; and Christie's mechanical ability 
contributed momentum. Mr. Fordney was a "live wire" and could step in 
anywhere. 



CHESTNUT "i" DUPB^ 




THE YEO GAVEL 



HISTORIC INTEREST 

The Yeo gavel was made from an oak plank taken from a lock in the 
"old Pennsylvania and Ohio canal," the canal on which James A. Garfield 
drove a canal boat. 

OWNERSHIP 

This eniblem of parliamentary authority is the property of Burgett E. Yeo 
and was used by him as president of the Blue and Gold Debating Club. 

INITIATION 

The famous memento was initiated by the gaveling of the Blue and Gold 
Debating Club, October 24, 1921, in room 14, Science Hall, Kent State Nor- 
mal College. This w^as a special meeting at which the club's constitution was 
adopted. 

MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING 

Whack! Bang! goes the gavel and Chairman Yeo sez "Gentlemen, this 
meetin' is now begun." Secretary Cain's silver plated pencil dancing as to jazz 
passes temporarily from the fovea. Mr. Zappolo reports that he has received 
"fo-bits" from some "poor feller" vsrho thinks he can debate. "Well, I de- 
clare," ejaculates Mr. Schneider, and radiates one of them disarming smiles of 
his'n. Colonel Zingery says "admit the gentleman," and "certainly," seconds 
Mr. Casey. In sonorous tones Mr. Christie suggests "We could work better in 
sections." "Better do it in the regular way," objects Mr. Overholt, strict 
constructionist, and Mr. Murlin's "I'll say so," lands the candidate upon the 
reservation. 

Mr. Crow, w^ho has been pluming his feathers for an oratorical flight ar- 
rives with Mr. Fodney. The brethren suspect that co-eds were the "primary 
passive" cause of the delay of these two forensic gentlemen. 

Whack! Bang! goes the gavel again and presently the room is full of elo- 
quence making unconditional the "Conquest of Mexico. 

Adjourned till the next meeting. 



CHESTNUT "{" DUPP^ 








THE LIBRARY 

Because all other departments in a school depend upon the Library department for 
their work in the bibliography of each special subject, the library of the Kent State Nor- 
mal College was one of the first departments to be considered in the organization of the 
school. A year before the school was opened in Kent, President McGilvrey consulted a 
librarian and talked over library plans. When the first summer term was opened in 1913 
there were library books to supplement the courses offered and a librarian was in charge 
of the department. 

During the eight years of the school, the library has grown to about 20,000 volumes. 
It subscribes for a large number of magazines and daily newspapers and is a member 
of several learned societies, receiving their publications. The bound file of magazines, 
which now numbers several hundred volumes is of inestimable value to all classes and is 
in constant use. 

The service of the library is extended to instructors, pupil teachers preparing for 
work in high school and elementary schools, senior and junior high school students, 
pupils of the elementary school, and in addition to those in residence, students from high 
schools in the vicinity come a distance of from one to twenty miles to spend whole days 
working on debates and school themes. Women's Clubs of Kent and surrounding towns 
also make use of the library. 

The opportunity for library service to teachers and students connected with the 
school is limited only by the amount of money appropriated by the legislature for books 
and for librarians to carry on the work. It is the plan of the library organizations to re- 
place worn books, to purchase new books in every needed subject, to furnish sufficient 
duplicates for the number of users, to furnish classics and works of standard authors for 
students who are especially interested in reading further than class assignments and for 
recreational reading. It is hoped that the library staff may be increased in accordance 
with the growth of the library that there may be always a sufficient number of librarians 
to thoroughly organize the library material to make it easily accessible to users and to 
allow time for personal work with the students. A special library building adapted to 
the needs of the students is the dream of the department. These things will all be pro- 
vided when our needs are known, for the people of Ohio wish provision made for the edu- 
cation of their children and are willing to be taxed for that purpose. Those in charge 
of the library department of the Kent State Normal College are eager to have in this de- 
partment of the school, as well as that of the whole school, a matter of pride to the 
State of Ohio. 



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MANUAL ARTS BUILDING 




MECHANICAL DRAWING CLASS 
82 



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MANUAL TRAINING 

One of the largest and most important of the departments in our schools 
and colleges today, is the Manual Training Department. Any high school 
that is without Manual Training is considered behind the times. Shop work 
forms habits of observation, precision and honesty, because in working out a 
project, a person does it either right or wrong. 

Upon entering for the first time the Manual Arts building at Kent State 
Normal College, a person gets the impression that it is a one story building. 
But as he looks about, he discovers that he is in a three-story building. His 
first impression of the place is immediately changed, for from the ground he 
has entered the third story. 

By this time he v/ishes to make an investigation of the place. The first 
thing that will attract his attention will be the mechanical draw^ing class. The 
mechanical draw^ing room is provided with twenty-four drawing tables and at 
each table he sees an industrious student expressing his ideas in black and 
white. 

These ideas are put upon paper in a language that is used by all nations. 
Then his attention is attracted across the hall to another room. In this room 
he sees another class of students working at tv/enty-four small desks. They 
are doing coping-sa\v work, and square and slant end sawing. In this •work 
they learn the methods of teaching the young boys in our public schools to 
make their own playthings and some useful pieces of furniture. 

Next the visitor passes into the wood-working department. Here he 
sees the students at the twenty-four benches, sawing, planing and hammering. 
The student learns to use the wood-working tools skilfully and in a way that 
enables him to teach others effectively. On this third floor he will also notice 
the wood-working machines, such as planer, jointer, rip saw, and lathe. These 
are all run by electric motors. 

Next he goes to the second floor and sees the lumber room arranged in 
a systematic order. From this floor he passes down to the first floor and sees 
the metal working class, noisy and industrious. Here he will see where in- 
struction is given in harness making, machinery repairing, and cement work. 
By this time he is able to see how a manual training student shapes his ideas 
on paper, wood, and in iron. 

The wood-working course teaches the student to be precise and accurate 
in measurements. This knowledge enables him to turn out valuable and 
beautiful pieces of furniture. The mechanical drawing course familiarizes 
him with the tools of the draughtsman, thus enabling him to draw plans for 
machinery parts, furniture, and even for homes. 

Although Mr. Van Deusen is a little man, we must congratulate him for 
his great energy, patient guidance, and the good instruction that he always 
gives to his students. 

Mr. Van Deusen is assisted by Mr. Damann, well known as an earnest and 
tireless worker. Kindly and sympathetic, he is a friend to all who come in 
contact with him. 

We have a right to be proud of our Manual Training Department in K. 
S. N. C, for it is one of the best in the state; it is keeping up with all the latest 
educational movements of the time. 

WILBERT E. MATHIAS. 



CHESTNUT /AT// DUPB^ 



THE ALUMNI 

The Alumni Association of Kent State Normal College is fast becoming 
an effective organization. At present there are more than one thousand mem- 
bers v^rho, after graduating from the K. S. N. C, find themselves looking for- 
ward each year to the Home-Coming and Commencement exercises, when old 
friends may once more live through their happy college days. 

Each year new^ fellow^-alumni members are to be greeted. They are 
eager to take a share in the responsibility of making our organization, not only 
one that will be permanent, but one that all may regard with a feeling of love 
and pride. New^ faculty members are always given a hearty welcome as the 
Alumni are interested in the organization and development of the school, which 
for them has spelled opportunity. 

Although our Alumni Association is composed of graduates of only nine 
years, w^e know that our influence is becoming more and more widespread as 
our class-mates are found, not only in Northeastern Ohio but in many states 
of the Union, and even in the Philippines. 

As w^e meet this year to w^elcome the new members into our ranks and to 
renew old friendships, we feel more deeply than ever that Kipling expressed 
our creed w^hen he wrote: 

"When Crew and Captain understand each other to the core. 
It takes a gale and more than a gale to put their ship ashore; 
For the one w^ill do what the other commands, although they 

are chilled to the bone, 
And both together can live through weather that neither could 

face alone." 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPP^ 




HAWAIIAN SNAP SHOTS 
85 



CHESTNUT "(" DURR^ 

SCENES FROM HAWAII 

By Marjorie Bourne, formerly of Kent State Normal Library 

1. Hawaiian spearing flsh from his outrigger canoe. 

2. Surf seen from Diamond Head. Black Point in the distance. 

3. Coasting on a wave crest in an outrigger canoe, one of the thrills Hawaii furnishes. 

4. Rice fields and cocoanut palms. 

5. Native boys climbing for cocoanuts. 

6. Library of Hawaii. Monkey pod tree on the right. 

7. Hawaiian "luau" or feast. Notice the calabashes for "poi." 

8. Diamond Head Light House. This is seen from the ship soon after Koko Head is 
sighted. Diamond Head is an extinct volcano which the government has fortified 
after the fashion of Gibraltar. Fort Kuger lies in its crater. 

Kalia Road running parallel to the ocean out at Waikiki. 

10. Wonderful Hawaiian Moonlight. 

11. Water buffalo plowing a field for rice. 

12. The famous Pali over which Kamniehameho I. drove the native tribes when he con 
quered the island. The wind blows here continually. 



There were no Senior Class? 

Ruby C. liked chemistry? 

Florence K, could not eat pie? 

Kaifer could love everyone? 

Eddie could not referee? 

Ruthy S. forgot to comb her hair? 

Dave could not yell? 

Elsie could not dance? 

Jean could not study? 

Nellie could not argue? 

Edna L. could not ask questions? 

Anabel R. could not giggle? 

Fern got to bed before 12 bells? 

Mary G. did not know Pete? 

Pat could buy the pool room? 

Cookie did not have to walk so far? 

Wanda would recite? 

Sheats got lost coming to the dorm? 

Cletus C. could sing? 

Frances O. would not go to C. E. every Sunday night? 

Dot S. did not look so serious? 

Bertie D. could make a speech? 

Mary Thomas could not smile? 

Dorothy Knox could be Mrs. Wheeler? 

Wilber Cole forgot to comb his hair? 

Betty did not like cider? 

Juva couldn't play basket ball? 

Mabel T. could not use the "Chestnut Burr" for an excuse? 



CHESTNUT "(" DUPP^ 

SAVED 

Hatless, coatless, collarless, breathless, he paced the narrow room like a caged lion 
before supper. His eyes had a haunted look; his hair was mussed. As he spoke, his 
voice sounded as hollow as the crack of doom, whatever that is. 

Will she never come? She promised to come to my room at eight o'clock; it is now 
eight-four and she is not here yet." His pacing grew faster and he wrung his hands ner- 
vously. A casual observer might have concluded he was agitated. He was. He spoke 
again in a tense, vibrant tone. 

"It is now eight-flve and she is not here. What can be keeping her away? Has she 
forgotten her promise to me? Has she gone back on me? O faithless woman!" 

Suddenly a knock sounded upon the door. He reached it in one stride and opened 
it. 

"Saved!" he cried' as he greeted the woman. "Saved! I can still make the first 
show!" Deep relief replaced his agitation as he drew a clean collar from the bundle 
that the laundry-woman had just handed him. 

Adapted by ISOBEL CHANDLER, '23. 

First Student — "You had better keep your eyes open today." 
Second Student — "Why?" 

First Student — "You would look queer walking around with them closed, wouldn't 
you?" 

THE MAGAZINES 

"Modern Priscllla" FRANK MOORE 

"Youth's Companion" — ANNE LEWIS 

"Country Gentleman" HOWARD SHEPARD 

"Every Day" MR. MANCHESTER 

"Life" - CHRIS CLEVENGER 

"Independent" THELMA KAIFER 

"Literary Digest" PERN GATES 

"Good Housekeeping" JENNIE CLEVENGER BLASCHKE 

"Shadowland" ALICE LEVY 

"Art Craft" _ WALT HAHN 

"Woman's Home Companion" BURGETT YEO 

"Review of Reviews" ELINORE GRIER 

"Vanity Fair" KENNETH KINGSLEY 

"Judge" MR. BILTZ 

WHY I CAME TO SCHOOL 

Ruth Dingman — To give natural color to the class. 

Dick Renouf — To amuse the class. 

Gale Sheats — To keep Harriet company. 

David Beckwith — To help Mr. McGilvrey manage the school. 

Alice Sigler — To teach girls how to be dignified. 

H. E. Robson — To practice argumentation. 

Janice Moore — To set a good example for other girls. 

Mary Thomas — To choose a career. 

Isobel C. — To take walks with Pat. 

87 



CHESTNUT /^/// DUPP^ 




THE CAMPFIRE 

"How-do-you-do, Miss Campfire? Very glad to meet you." 
"How do you do, Mr. School." 

"Hasn't this been lovely weather? How long have you been in town?" 
"Oh, we organized in October, but you probably did not hear much about us that 
soon because we hadn't really started our activities. Then you know the first three 
months are necessarily spent in getting equipment together and making a foundation." 
"You must have interesting meetings. Miss Campfire." 

"Oh, please, call me Kokokoho, rather than Miss Campfire. You see that is really 
my first name, because Campfire includes all the different Campfires but Kokokoho 
means just me. Yes, our meetings are interesting but we like best those in which we 
sew or crochet, and of course our ceremonial meetings are always enjoyable." 
"Have you done much sewing and crocheting?" 

"We made organdie and cheneal flowers which were sold at the Y. W. bazaar. Then 
there are things going on right now in that line but we haven't made those public yet, 
and so I ought not to tell." 

"What about your outfits, where do you get them?" 

"We make them. Our dresses come already cut out and we sew them up." 
"But you buy your headbands?" 

"No, indeed we don't. Each girl makes her own. Yes, you may well exclaim, be- 
cause it does seem impossible, but it Isn't. The girls make their own and they prixe 
them when they are finished. It would take considerable to induce one of them to give 
up her headband." 

The figures? Oh, yes, every one means something. The figure furthest to the 
side is the owl and is the symbol which represents Kokokoho. All of the girls put that 
on their headbands. The next is the crosslogs and fire which of course is the symbol 
for the Campfire and is national. Then the one right in the center is the symbol which 
belongs to that girl alone. Each one picks out her individual name and symbol." 

"No wonder they prize the headbands when they mean so much. I suppose you 
ought not to tell what you are planning for the future?" 

"Well, no, not really, but I hear that there are rumors of numerous hikes and out- 
door parties and, unless something happens, of going camping this summer." 
"Isn't there a guardian? Who is she?" 

"Yes, there is a guardian and she is Miss Pa — . Well, she might not like to have her 
name told, but she is one of the faculty and teaches sewing. I'm sure any of the girls 
will tell you who she is because they all like her and are proud of her." 

"Who is in the circle? When we have roll call, we answer as follows: 

Our Guardian, Yoki MISS PATRICK 

Our President, Kwo-ne-she ADELE ANDREWS 

Our Secretary, Uda GRACE SHARPE 

Lexse KATHRYN HAMLEY 

Nyoda ZILA BEHM 

Ayudi GRACE CHANNON 

Kewane Alan DORIS LESLIE 

Twaklia RUTH SNYDER 

Wikaki Nahon LUCILLE SHARPE 

Anapo EVELYN TOMPKINS 

88 



CHESTNUT 'f{" DURP^ 



Home-coming of course is a bigger and better affair each year. Nineteen 
hundred and twenty-two brought more alumni and former students than had 
ever gathered in Kent for a Hke affair. The visitors began to arrive early 
and the majority stayed longer than is usually the case. All through the two 
days a genuine joy seemed to pervade. The play was a brilliant success, the 
luncheon was the best ever served for home-coming, the basketball games were 
spirited, and the party Saturday evening w^as a happy culmination for the long 
looked-for celebration. 

The anticipation of the home-comer is w^ell expressed in the follovsring 
lines: 

(With apologies to Dr. Van Dyke.) 

I know that Athens's wonderful, and Miami is mighty fine. 
Bowling Green defeats us and snows us under from time to time; 
Ohio State is popular for youths on technique bent. 
But when it comes to real schooling, there's no place like Kent. 

So it's home again, and home again, 
Kent Normal School for me; 
My heart is turning home again 

And there I soon shall be 

With teachers staid, and pals all true, 
Old Kent's the place for me. 



CHESTNUT "(fi DUPB^ 



PROGRAM 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1922 
Morning and Afternoon 
Merrill and Science Halls 
Demonstration Classes 
in the 
Training School 
College Classes at Home to Visitors 
Eight O'clock, Annual College Play 
Booth Tarkington's Comedy 
"CLARENCE- 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1922 

Twelve-Thirty O'clock 

Luncheon, Lowry Hall 

Three O'clock 

Basket Ball, Alumni vs. College 

Seven O'clock 

Basket Ball, Hiram College vs. K. S. N. C. 

Eight O'clock 

Party. Moulton Hall 

Faculty and Seniors at Home 

to Home-Comers 



CHESTNUT "{'' DURP^ 




CHESTNUT "(" DURR^ 

" CLARENCE " 




THE CAST OF CHARACTERS 

In the Order of their appearance 

Mrs. Martyn MISS KATHERINE BENSON 

Mr, Wheeler MR. CALVIN RAUSCH 

Mrs. Wheeler MISS DOROTHY KNOX 

Bobbie Wheeler MR. RICHARD RENOUF 

Cora Wheeler MISS MILDRED BASEY 

Violet Pinney MISS GLADYS THOMPSON 

Clarence MR. PAUL SPANGLER 

Delia MISS LUCILE SHAFER 

Dinwiddie MR. ELDEN SCHNEIDER 

Mr. Hubert Stem MR. HOWARD SHEPHERD 

Rosie, a Voice MISS MARGARET FINK 



S2 



CHESTNUT /^/// BUPP^ 





SCENES FROM "CLARENCE" 
93 



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I ^ 




SNAPS 
94 



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ATHLEITCGS 




CHESTNUT /w/ DUPE^ 



ATHLETICS 



'E e e Yah! flght! 



-Kent!" 



Our football field saw a season of hard use when the fourteen sturdy Kent warriors 
tackled and charged each other in its tawny dust making the team of 1921. We went 
against everybody that would play us and because of our showing the best teams in the 
conference will play us next year. Already contracts are signed with Mt. Union, Hiram, 
Ashland, St. Ignatius and Bowling Green. Pennsylvania State Normal and Akron Univer- 
sity are negotiating for games. With the increased number of men in school, our veteran 
players back, and a good number of high school graduates turned this way, we will keep 
up the good fight of 1920 and '21. 

All of our last year's basket ball regulars were teaching this year, but came back to 
play the alumni game at home-coming time. The new team showed its metal in every con- 
test and scored more points in the last half of nearly every game played than it did in 
the first. 

With the appearance of the annual, Captain Hardy's track team will have carried on 
our first track season. He was one of Akron Central's best men and has some promising 
runners working with him. 

This is March 23 and the baseball players are already on the diamond regardless of 
the snow that covers the hillside. 



FOOTBALL— 1920 

LOUIS CARNAHAN Manager 

CLAUDE RYAN Captain 

BASKET BALL— 1921 

SMITH LINE Manager 

ED. EVANS - Captain 

TRACK— 1921 
L. E. HARDY ;.. Captain 



LETTER MEN 



FOOTBALL 

Claude Ryan, Captain 

Louis Carnahan, Manager 

Richard Renouf 

G. A. Damann 

L. D. Hibbard 

Johnny Schwartz 

Russell Hausman 

Paul Spangler 

Ralph Rogers 

Howard Shepherd 

J. J. Deetz 

Oliver Wolcott 



George Pordney 
David Beckwith 
Harold Pinach 
Howard Evans 

BASKET BALL 
Ed. Evans. Captain 
Smith Line, Manager 
Howard Shepherd 
Ralph Rogers 
Leroy Elker 
Howard Evans 
Harold Luxon 
L. E. Hardy 



CHESTNUT "(" DURR>-. 




CHESTNUT "fjf BUPF^ 




CHESTNUT ^//// DUPg^ 

GIRLS' TOURNAMENT STARTS AT KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 
MARCH 7, 1922 
In the opening round of play for the girls' basket ball championship ot Kent State 
Normal College here last night, the Juniors nosed out the Seniors, 13-8, and the College 
team walked over the Off-Campus, 10-0. The Junior-Senior game was slow and at the 
half the Juniors led, 9-6. In the last half they further increased their lead and won easily, 
13-8. For the Juniors the work of Captain Carter, Carlson and Ort featured, while for the 
Seniors, the work of Benson, who scored all their points, was the best. 

Juniors, 13. B. F. T.P. Seniors, 8. B. F. T.P. 

R. Carlson, F 3 2 .s A. Van Ornum, F. .......... 



Clevenger, F 2 4 4 B. King 

J. Carter, C. . . . 1 1 K. Benson, C-F. . 

B. Byrnes, G . R. Swartz, G. . . . 

F. Ort, G. K. Gibbons, G-C. 



H. Hilditch, G. 



Totals 5 3 13 Totals 3 2 8 

Referee — Whyte of the Kent Ramblers. 

Time — Six-Minute Quarters; Score, first half, 9-0 .Umiors. 

The College Off-Campus game was fast and quite rough, but the superior team work 

of the College and the shooting of Van Wye and Cooke carried the College to ar. easy 
victory. At no time did the Off-Campus threaten. The work of Van Wye and Cooite 
for the College and that of Brown and Babb for the Off-Campus were features. 

College, 10 B F. T.P. Off-Campus. 0. B. F. T.P. 

J. Van Wye, F 3 6 O. Hackett, F 

H. Spinneweber, F L. Blackstone, F ... 

M. Cook, C 2 4 V. Brown (C), C 

M. Hawn, G. H. Babb, G 

A. Joyce, G A. Knapp, G 



ith, G. 



Totals 5 10 Totals 

Referee — Whyte of the Kent Ramblers. 

Time — Six-Minute Quarters; Score, first half, 4-0 College. 

Thursday night games — Juniors vs. Off-Campus; Seniors vs. College. 

JUNIORS AND COLLEGE CINCH TOURNAMENT LEAD 
MARCH 9, 1922 
By defeating the Off-Campus, 12-3, the Juniors went into a tie for first place in the 
girls' tournament, in the College, who nosed out the Seniors, 4-2, in the second round of 
games here Thursday night. The Junior Off-Campus game was a battle the first half, 
with the score standing, 4-2, Juniors at the end, but in the last periods the Juniors ran 
away and won an easy victory, 12-3. They did this only through some fine floor work and 
shooting by their star center and Captain Carter, and some excellent guarding by Byrnes 
and Ort, Brown and Smith starred for the Off-Campus. 

Juniors, 12. B. F. T.P. Off-Campus, 3. B. F. T.P. 

Carlson, F 1 2 Brown (C), F-C. ... 1 1 3 

C. Clevenger, F. 1 2 E. Hirshman. F. . 

Tarter (C), C 4 8 O. Hackett, C-F 



B. Byrnes, G. . . . H. Babb, 

F. Ort, G F. Smith, G. . . . 

A. Lanese, F 

Tita's 6 12 Totals 1 1 3 

Referee — Whyte ot the Kent Ramblers. 

Time — Six-Minute Quarters; Score, first half, 4-2 Juniors. 

In the second game the Seniors had a fine chance to put themselves near the top by 
winning, but they could not break through the defense of the College team and lost a 
hard fought and bitter battle, 4-2. This puts the College and Juniors tied for the lead 
and by an odd freak in the schedule, these teams battle next Monday night. It will be a 
battle for the championship and the other game between Seniors and Off-Campus will be a 
battle for third place. Van Wye and Cook starred for the College and the guards also did 
well. Benson and Van Ornum did the best for the Seniors, 

College, 4. B. F. T.P. Seniors, 2. B. F T P. 

H. Spinneweber, F K. Gibbons, F-C. 

J. Van Wye, F. 1 2 B. King, F ' ' ' 

M. Cook, C 1 2 K. Benson, C-F. . . 1 2 

A. Joyce. G. A. Van Ornum, G. 10 

M. Hawn, G. M. Swinehart, G. . ' ' 

M. Kulow, F H. Hilditch, F. . . . ; . 

Totals 2 4 Totals 1 2 

Referee — Whyte of the Kent Ramblers. 
Time — Six-Minute Quarters; Score, first half, 4-0 College, 

99 



CHESTNUT '"j» DUPP^ 



STAITDING. 

Team. W. F. Pet. Team. W. F. Pet. 

Colleg-e .. . .20 1.000 Seniors 2 ..... 

Juniors 2 1.000 Off Campus 2 

Final Games Monday Night — ^College vs. .Juniors; Seniors vs. Off-Campus. 
Scores Last Night — College, 4; Seniors, 2; ,Juniors, 12: Oft Campus, 3. 

COLLEGE TEAM WINS K. S. N. C. TOURNAMENT— NOSES OUT JUNIORS IN 
BITTER BATTLE, 7-6 

Before a very enthusiastic crowd of rooters, the College team nosed out the Juniors, 
7-6, and won the title in the girls' tournament at K. S. N. C. Monday night. It was the 
fastest game of the tournament, and a bitter battle from whistle to whistle. It was one 
of those hard to win, hard to lose variety, and the winners can feel themselves justly 
proud of the honor. In the preliminary game, for such it proved to be, the Seniors de- 
feated the Off-Campus, S-4, and won third place. Both games were in the third and final 
round. In the championship game, for both teams were tied with two victories apiece, 
it was fast and furious. At the first quarter the score was 0-0 and at the half, 2-2. In the 
last half both teams loosened up. With the score, 5-.5. H. Spinneweber (College) slipped 
one in from under the basket and the College led, 7-5, but J. Carter (Junior) dropped in 
a foul and it stood, 7-6. That's the way the game ended, both teams fighting hard. M. 
Cook, A. Joyce and M. Hawn starred for the winners, while J. Carter, F. Ort and R. Carl- 
son did the best for the Juniors. The preliminary game was slow. K. Benson and K. Gib- 
bons did the best for the Seniors while V. Brown and H. Rabb starred for the Off-Campus. 



Iiine-ups and Scores. 



Seniors, S. B. 

B, King, F. . . 1 

K. Gibbons, F-C. .... . 

K. Benson, C-F. . 3 

R. Swartz, G 

M. Swinehart, G 

Totals -t 



College, 7. B. 

V. Van Dye, F 

H. Spinneweber, F. 1 

M. Cook, C. ... 2 

\. Joyce, G 

M. Hawn, G. . . 

F. Critz, C 

M. Kulow. G. 



Off-Campus, 4. B. 

'. Brown, F 1 

.. Blackstone, F. . . . 1 

'. Smith, C 

:. Babb. G. 

.. Knapp, G. 



Totals 



CHAlVtFION'SHIF, 

F. T.P. 



Juniors, 6. B. 

R. Carlson, F. 1 

C. Clevenger, F. . 

J. Carter (C), C . ... 1 

B. Bvrnes, G. . . 

F. Ort, G 5 



Totals 3 1 7 Totals . 2 2 

Time — Six-Minute Quarters — both games; Score, first half, 2-2. 
Fouls — Personal — College, 10; Juniors, 4: Technical, Juniors, 1, 
Referee, E. Evans; Scorer, H. Shepherd; Timer. C. Rausch, Kent State Normal College. 

SCORES OF AI.I. GAMES. 

First Round — Juniors, 13; Seniors, S; College, 10; Off^Campus, 0. 
Second Round — Juniors 12; Off-Campus, 3; College, 4; Seniors, 2. 
Third Round— Seniors, S; Off-Campus, 4; College, 7; Juniors. 6. 



FINAIi STANDING. 







W. 
3 

1 



F. 



1 

3 


1 


Pet. 
000 


Juniors 




667 


Seniors .... 




333 


Otf-Campus 




000 


TOTAL . 






Player. 
K. Benson 


IITDIVIDTrAI. SCOBIITG 

Team. 
Seniors .... 


IN 


TOTTRNAIVIENT. 

B. 


J. Carter 


Juniors .. 








^ 


R. Carlson 


Juniors 








5 


M. Cook 


College 








^ 


J Van Wye 


College . . 








4 


C. Clevenger 


Juniors 










V. Brown 


Off-Campus . 








o 


H. Spinneweber 


College . . . 








1 


B. King 


Seniors 








1 


L. Blackstone 


Off-Campus 








1 


TOTAL . . 










34 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPP^ 










wv^ 




GIRLS' BASKET BALL SQUAD 
101 



CHESTNUT "(" DURP^ 

THE SNIPE HUNT 

The soft notes of a whip-poor-will floated up into the room where I was 
supposed to be asleep. I tiptoed to the window and answered the call. 
Then creeping back to the bed, I put on my coat and hat and after making 
certain that no one else in the house w^as astir, I stepped out on the porch roof 
and dropped to the ground. No sooner had 1 alighted than I was dragged 
into the shadow^ of a large rose bush. "Are you sure your father was sleeping 
when you came out?" said George. "He at least sounded like it," I answered. 

"Boys, it's time we were starting," said Turkey. 

At last my dream had come true. I was going snipe hunting. Even 
though I had to crawl out of a window in the middle of the night, the adven- 
ture was worth it. I could well remember the stories of snipe hunts that 
some of the older boys had told. Why shouldn't I be happy? I w^as the 
one chosen to hold the bag into which the snipes were to be driven. 

The night was rather dark. The boys said the snipe w^ould run extra 
well. We tramped several mlies back into the woods, and as we were cross- 
ing a small lot one of the boys called a halt. 

"Boys, " said Elson, "unless 1 was mistaken I saw^ a pair of eyes shining 
near that large tree over there." I had a strange feeling about that time, but 
I w^as going to see the thing through. 

"Now, fellow^s," said George, as he lighted the lantern w^hich he had 
been carrying, "we'll have to spread out and drive the snipe in." He set the 
lantern down by a log and showed me how to hold the sack. "Now, Bill," he 
said, "don't let any of them get by you." 

In a few minutes the boys had gone. I was the least bit nervous at be- 
ing left alone, but I gripped the sack tight, and waited. The boys had told 
me that the snipes would run directly towards the light. I was holding the 
sack in front of the light, so that I was certain to get at least one. 

As 1 was waiting for the boys to start the drive, I began to wonder what a 
snipe looked like. Suppose they were large; could I hold one when I had it 
in the bag. 1 w^as turning these questions over in my mind w^hen I heard the 
boys start the drive. They were about a half mile farther dow^n the ridge. 
But instead of coming closer, they gradually seemed to get farther away. 



CHESTNUT 'f{" DUPB^ 



In a few minutes all the noise ceased. I was alone, and lost. I called 
for the boys, but they did not answer. "What a fool I was to run off from 
home," I thought. The boys had played a joke on me. 

While I crouched there by the log, wondering how I was to get home, I 
felt a growng impulse to turn around. 1 fought against it, but slowly turned, 
and there not ten feet from me was crouched a panther. 

I screamed and tried to run, but my strength failed. My eyes were 
riveted upon those of the panther. The green of them burned into my brain. 
Eternity passed as I w^atched the beast craw^l nearer. "Oh, why did the 
beast not spring upon me and end my misery?" 

1 thought of all the sorrow I was bringing my folks at home. I could see 
Mother going into my room and crying when she found me gone. "Was that 
she 1 heard calling me now^?" I tried to answer but failed. My breath was 
coming fast and hard. Something had a hold of me. 1 closed my eyes and 
when I opened them again, Mother was shaking me. "Son," she said, "I told 
you not to eat that pie before you went to bed last night." 

WILLIAM DORRANCE, 'lb. ^ 




CHESTNUT "fjf DUPB^ 





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CHESTNUT "(" DUPP^ 



TRAINING SCHOOL FACULTY 



Miss Herta Heberlin Kindergarten 

Miss Clara D. Hitchcock First Grade 

Miss Ida E. Jacobson Second Grade 

Miss Blanid Sweeney Third Grade 

Miss Elsie Mabee (A. B., Pd. M., Ph. D.) Fourth Grade 

Miss Bess Rider Fifth Grade 

Miss Maude Van Antwerp Sixth Grade 

Miss Nora O'Rourke Junior and Senior High School (English) 

Miss Isabelle Hazen Junior and Senior High School (Latin and English 

Miss Mirtie Mabee (Pd.M., A.B., B.S.) Junior and Senior H. S. (Mathematics) 

Mr. Frank N. Harsh Senior High School (Mathematics and Science) 

Mr. Henri Boulet, B. S French 

Miss Ora Belle Bachman Music 

Miss Rena S. Pottorf Public School Art 

Mr. George A. Damann Manual Training 

Mrs. Edith M. Olson Principal Junior High School 

Mr. Charles F. Koehler (Ph. B., M. A.) Principal Senior High School 

Mr. Emmett C. Stopher (A. B. ) Superintendent of Training School 

Miss May H. Prentice Director of Training 



CHESTNUT "(" DUPB^ 



JUNIOR HI6H'2 2 




THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

The Junior High School consists of three grades, the seventh, eighth and 
ninth. 

School is carried on in the Junior High much as it is in the Senior High. 
The pupils go from one room to another for their different classes, and in 
several other ways they are like their older brothers and sisters. 

The school day in the Junior High School is divided into seven periods 
of from forty-five to fifty-five minutes in length. School begins at eight- 
thirty, and, except for an hour and a half at noon, is in session until three forty- 
five. 

There are three room teachers. A teacher whose desk is located in a 
certain room is called the room teacher of that grade. She is responsible in 
every w^ay, especially for the conduct, of the grade of w^hich she is in charge. 

Miss O'Rourke is the room teacher of the seventh grade. The room- 
teachers of the eighth and ninth grades are Miss Mabee and Mrs. Olson. Mrs. 
Olson is also principal of the Junior High. 

The special subjects are taught by special teachers. These teachers are: 
Miss Pottorf, Miss Bachman, and Miss Hyde. The other teachers are: Miss 
Hazen, Miss Patrick, Miss Nixson, Mr. Van Deusen, and Mr. Boulet. 

Of course the conduct of the pupils in the Junior High is not perfect; in 
fact, for a w^hile it w^as so far from perfect that the teacher decided that some- 
thing had to be done. The pupils of the ninth grade then decided that they 
should govern themselves. And this is the plan that they follow^ed. 

In each grade the three officers, president, vice-president, and secretary, 
and three other students -were chosen to act as the Student Council for that 
grade. The president acted as chairman and one of the other councilmen 
was chosen bailiff. 

The duties of the councilmen were to take the names of any of the pupils 
out of order, hand the complaint to the chairman, and meet with the other 
members to decide the penalty. If the accused student denied the charge. 




CHESTNUT "{'' DUPP^ 

the person who handed in his or her name was called as a witness. Some 
of the penalties were as follows: w^ashing the desks, w^atering the plants, clean- 
ing the blackboards, and being denied the right of playing basket ball. 

Besides the separate councils of each grade, there is a council composed 
of the president and vice-president of each class. This council meets to decide 
matters concerning two or more of the classes. 

There are some features of the Junior High School that are very 
uncommon. There are eight educational magazines taken by the li- 
brary that are left in each room of the Junior High School for the 
pupils to read. And the pupils also have study periods in which one 
or two of their lessons can be prepared. This makes the work easier, 
as it leaves less to be done at home. 

To tell the truth, the organization in the Junior High is excellent 
because it allow^s the pupils much freedom, but at the same time it gets results 
in the way of good lessons and good conduct. 

Each room in the Junior High School is fitted up with globes, maps, edu- 
cational pictures, books and magazines. 

Every Friday there is a Junior High School assembly in the music room. 
We occasionally sing but more frequently we are given educational talks. 
Some of them have been on "Conduct," "Manners," and "How to obtain a 
book from the Library." Soon after our Christmas vacation, Mrs. Olson told 
us about her trip to Washington. When she had finished we felt as if we had 
all accompanied her. 

The seventh grade study Arithmetic, History, Geography, Literature and 
English. In Arithmetic they have built a house. They make all of their own 
plans and draw^ings. In history they have studied the development of our 
country Several plays that they have given, have made this more interesting. 
In Geography they have special talks, lantern slides, lectures, and books. In 
Literature they have studied "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," and "Snow 
Bound." They have besides these subjects, sewing and manual training, 
which they attend twice a week. 

The eighth grade study Arithmetic, English, Literature, History, Civics, 
Geography and Biology. In Arithmetic they have studied insurance, stocks, 
bonds, taxes, and banking. They are given an imaginary allowance of sixty 
dollars a month. They may spend this in any way, but they must keep a 
record of all money spent. In Literature they have read "Evangeline," "Mid- 
summer Night's Dream," and the "Vision of Sir Launfal. ' The work in Civics 
consists of a series of talks, lessons, and excursions. There w^as a trip to the 
stores of Kent. Following this there was a general class discussion about the 
im.provements found. In Geography and History they have gone to "The 
Kent Machine Company" and the "Mason Tire & Rubber Company." 

The ninth grade subjects are Science, English, Algebra, and a choice of 
Latin, French, or Sewing and Manual Training. In Science they have visited 
the "Akron Gorge," several sand banks, gullies and valleys. 

In English they have read "The Lady of the Lake," "Treasure Island" 
and "Marmon." The Algebra class takes problems from the book but they 
use all original rules. The Latin class has studied the customs and habits of 
the Romans. 

107 




CHESTNUT "f'i BURR^ 



Athletic activities are not neglected while we are seeking 
book knowledge. 

Last fall, during the football season, the Junior High School 
lurnished several men for the Senior High School second team. 

The ninth, which as you knov^r corresponds to the freshman 
class in other schools, furnished two men for the varsity football team, several 
for the 'varsity track team, and for the baseball team. We also furnished one 
player for the girls' basket ball team. 

The basket ball games between rooms were exciting at times, especially 
the inter-class championship games. These games, while not displaying the 
speed or ability of more experienced men, were, we think, as a whole very 
good. 

Baseball was taken up next with a team representing each room of the 
Junior High School. No Babe Ruths were discovered or any pitching marvels 
but we did play a good game of scrub ball. 

During the school year of 1921 and 1922 the Junior High 
School had many interesting social events. 

One of the parties w^hich w^as looked forward to probably 
the most was the Hallowe'en party given the afternoon before 
Hallowe'en. Some of the boys and girls of Junior High danced 
for "Queen Spooka." A member of the Senior High School told 
a thrilling ghost story which increased the "spookiness" of the 
ifternoon. "Queen Spooka" seemed to have a good time also, 
as she nodded her head to every one. The parents and friends of the children 
joined in the fun. Afterwards the refreshments were served. 

Another enjoyable event was the Christmas party. Christmas carols 
were sung and some sort of a program w^as presented by each grade. One of 
Santa Claus' helpers arrived just in time to distribute presents to the seventh 
grades, but to the disappointment of the eighth and ninth grades, Santa had no 
gifts for them. He thought that they were too old to play with toys. Apples 
and cake were served after the fun. 

Every January or February v/e have a sleigh ride party which is looked 
forward to. At the last one we met at the home of one of the pupils, then we 
had a sleigh ride through the country. After that we returned to the gather- 
ing place and here games were played and refreshments served. Everyone 
had an interesting time at this party. 

Another social event enjoyed by the Junior High School was a party given 
on Washington's birthday. There were old-fashioned dances by the pupils of 
Junior High. Some of the dancers -wore old-fashioned costumes which made 
the effect of the dancing more beautiful. Social dancing and games were in- 
teresting features of the day. Later, punch and wafers were served. 

Every Friday afternoon, for one hour, w^e have social dancing in the gym- 
nasium These dances are very helpful to the boys and girls who do not know 
how to dance, but wish to learn. They, also, are enjoyed by those who can 
dance. 

The Junior High School spend many happy moments at picnics in the 
Normal woods. Lunches are served, of course, and games are played. 

108 




CHESTNUT ///// DURP^ 



An interesting feature of social life in 1922 was a luncheon which the 
ninth grade girls' cooking class gave the boys of their class. Music was enjoyed 
while they ate and in this way the time passed quickly. 

The eighth grade had a health campaign and the losing side gave the 
winners a party. Dancing and games were the main features of the day. This 
Junior High School has enjoyed other social events, but the one the ninth 
grade v^fill never forget is the farewell party the seventh and eighth gave them. 
Since the ninth grade were leaving the Junior High School, the other tvvo grades 
thought it w^ould be fitting to give them a party. If you have ever attended a 
farewell party you will know what it is. Dancing and refreshments were the 
pleasures of the evening. 

We think, as a whole, the Junior High School is pretty good and when we 
leave it to go into the Senior High School we can look back with a feeling of 
satisfaction on those three years when we were getting a foundation for a 
higher education in the Kent Normal Junior High School. 

Written by ROBERT STOPHER. 
NEVA SKINNER. 
EARL AIKEN. 
NAOMI JOHNSON. 

Ninth Grade. 




CHESTNUT "(" DURR^ 




TRAINING SCHOOL 



CHESTNUT ///// DURP^ 



THE CHESTNUT BLOSSOM 



Kent Normal Elementary Training School 



Vol. 



No. 1 



Published monthly by the Normal Training School 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



DOROTHY DIRKSON, Editor-in-Chief 
KEITH SHURTZ 
MAXINE MOORE 
SUSIE PALFI 
HELEN CLUFF 



ELIZABETH RUFENER 
BETTY ANDERSON 
JOHN HENRY DREW 
CORRINNE HULBERT 



SUBSCRIPTION FORM 

STAFF OF THE CHESTNUT BLOSSOM per copy. (Foreign or Canadian, two 

Kent Normal Elementary Training '^'^"''^ P'^'" copy.) 

School, Kent, Ohio. Name 

Children : Please enter my subscrip- Street Address 

tion for the Chestnut Blossom at one cent City and State 



EDITORIAL 



Sympathetic and intelligent apprecia- 
tion of the boy and girl; the contrast 
between intense activity out of school 
and comparative inactivity within tlie 
school; the contrast between the view- 
points of the child and adult — these con- 
siderations suggest an approach to con- 
ception (if the purpose of elementary 
education. 

The problem of elementary education 
concerns itself with boys and girls. Ap- 
proach this problem by thinking of teach- 
ing boys and girls rather than teaching 
reading, writing and arithmetic. State 
the problem in terras of helpin.E; pupils 
to do better in their normal activities. 

The purpcse of elementary education 
should be: To help boys and girls to do 
better in all those wholesome activities 
in which they normally engage. This 
purpose implies an unqualified reference 
to the immediate present. The child is 
best prepared for life as an adult by ex- 
periencing in childhood what has mean- 
ing to him as a child. 

OUR PLAY GROUND 

Last summer some of the Home and 
School League mothers thought they 
would like to make some money for a 
play ground for us. They set up a stand 
and sold ice-cream cones, pop, chocolate 
bars, and chewing gum. 

The mothers took turns about selling 
these things. They made almost four 
hundred dollars. They enjoyed very 
much knowing how the children would 
appreciate it. 



By doing tliis they made enough money 
to equip our playground with an ocean 
wave, the swings, the giant stride, the 
trapese, and the fireman ladder. 

We thank our mothers very much for 
these things. All the children like to 
play on our play ground. Even when 
school is out we run for the play ground 
where we all have lots of fun. 

FLORENCE RAMICONE, 
JANET SMITH, 
JAMES HAUSMAN, 
VIRGINIA GABOR, 

Grade 4. 

We should save our money in the- 
school. Sometimes if we happen to have 
a nickel or a dime we would think of 
spending it for candy. But do not think 
of candy all the time. Think of the 
school bank. Save your money in the 
school bank. Little by little every 
penny, nickel and dime will grow into 
dollars and dollars grow into hundreds. 
So Save your money in the school bank. 

GEORGE SPAIN. 

TOYS 

The sixth grade boys made quite a col- 
lection of toys, such as tumbler, feeding 
pen, fish, balancing pony and wrestlers. 
Most of the boys gave theirs away for 
Christmas presents. 

LOUIS FOGG, Grade 6. 



CHESTNUT "i" DURB^ 



THE RAIN DROPS 

Beautiful drops of rain 

I liear you go pitter patter on tlie pane. 

I try to catcli you; it is vain. 

As you patter on the pane. 

KATHERINE SMITH, Grade 5. 

OUR DOLL HOUSE 

At scliool we had some boys get some 
boxes. They took them down to Mr. Van 
Deusen. He put them together. We 
made them into rooms. We have the 
kitchen, dining-rot m, bedroom, and liv- 
ing-room This is what we made for it. 
I made some curtains. We made a lamp, 
fire place, book cases, table and some 
chairs and we wove rugs. After we had 
our rugs woven we had our picture taken. 
ALICE LOUISE BIRKNER, Grade 3. 

RAG DOLLS 

We made a rag doll and this is how we 
made it. Miss Sweeney gave us the pat- 
tern and cloth. Then we pinned the pat- 
tern to the cloth and cut it and brought 
it home and sewed it. Then we stuffed 
it up. 

Then we made the hair on it. 

After the hair was dry we made dress- 
es. We made tlie pattern, then we had 
to bring cloth. When we got the dresses 
made we made the eyes. 

CLARA RAMICONE, Grade 3. 

BIRDS WE'RE FEEDING 

We like the busy chickadee 
And feed her crumbs and suet. 
And when we say "Eat your lunch." 
She'll go ahead and do it. 

And next we choose our sparrow friend 
With all her saucy chatter, 
Whenever we give her crumbs to eat 
She'll always go and do it. 

We choose the Bluejay last of all. 

And now let me explain. 

She gossips all the whole day long 

And oh! but she is vain. 

MARY JANE MANCHESTER, Grade 4. 

THE BOYS AT MANUAL TRAINING 

Some boys in Manual Training are 
making beds, chairs, tables, tabourettes, 
and settees, and some are making boxes. 
We have a hard time getting our figures 
right and to cut our lines straight. 

In making boxes we get our piece of 
st-awboard, then we make our lines. We 
cut the strawboard rn the lines and on 
some boxes we put colored paper. Next 
we put them in a p'-ess and let them 
stand a day and then we nut our gummed 
paper on and they are done. 

GILBERT SMITH, Grade 5. 



OUR STORES 

This autumn our fourth grade planned 
en having stores. We thought it best 
to have a grocery and dry goods store, 
a postoffice and a bank. So we started. 

The boys brcught boxes to make the 
stores. All the stores are done now. 
Look at them in Room 27. 

We play in the stores every day. You 
can buy any article that you can buy 
down town in such stores. You'll see 
our pictures in this paper. 

GLADYS MOORE, 
ARDEN SMITH, Grade 4. 

EUGENE FIELD'S POEM ABOUT THE 
DUEL 

Miss Jacobson taught the poem to us. 
We enjoyed it very much. We thought 
it was very nice, and we wanted to play 
it. We thought it would be nice to have 
a puppet show. We learned it and 
played it. We chose Winifred Watrous 
to recite it. We made a gingham dog 
and a calico cat. We played it for the 
kindergarten and the kindergarten 
thanked us. We had lots of fun playing 
it. 

WINNIFRED WATROUS, Grade 2. 

THE HAPPY CHILDREN 

School is cut. School is out. 
The happy voices shout. 
All off for the playground. 
With laughter all about. 

The giant stride is big and strong, 
So all that go will swing along. 
The teeter-totters go up and down. 
The ocean waves go round and round. 
The boys will push. 
The girls will ride. 
When the boys are tired, 
The girls will tease. 
Oh, come, give us another ride, please. 
ANNABEL, Grade 5. 

THE PLAYGROUND 

We have a playground. And I'm going 
to tell you about it. We have a merry- 
go-round and a giant's stride and swings 
and we have a sliding board and a cnin- 
ning bar and a haud-over-hand bar. And 
we have a trapese, too. All these things 
make all boys and girls healthy and wise. 
GEORGE SAVULEV, Grade 3. 

THE SCHOOL BANK 

We have a bank up at the school. 
Every week they put money in the bank. 
They press a button, and a stamp comes 
out. And we paste them on a card. 
Some children have three cents, and oth- 
ers have one cent. I have one cent 'w 
the bank. 



CHESTNUT ///// DURR^ 



I saw the works. They are long things, 
and when you press the button it goes un- 
der a wooden thing. There are pennies, 
nicliels, dimes and quarters. And there 
are little round things that yc-u put the 
money into. 

HAZEL A. MANES, Grade 3. 

THE ADVENTURE OP THE THREE 
ELKS INN 

(Franklin, walking along a road on a 
rainy night sees a light of a public inn 
called the Three Elks. Franklin enters 
the inn, shivering. A fire was burning 
brightly, but a crowd gathered around it, 
holding their chairs tightly so as not to 
lose them.) 

Franklin: "Ho, Landlord, a peck of oys- 
ters for my horse." 

Landlord: "What, your horse eat oys- 
ters?" 

Franklin: "Give him a peck. I assure 
you they will not be wasted." 

Landlord (rushing out) : "A horse eat 
oysters with the shells on!" 

(Franklin picks the best chair as the 
crowd retires, so as to be able to roast 
his oysters and warm himself, too.) 

Landlord (rushing in) : "Your horse 
won't eat oysters, sir." 

Franklin: "What, won't eat oysters? 
Why, the silly thing. He doesn't know 
what's good, but as those oysters are too 
good to be wasted, I will eat them." 

LESTER AIKEN, Grade 6. 

OUR BAZAAR 

In the fall the fourth grade wanted ta 
get some money and the eighth grade 
did also. So we got together and decided 
to have a bazaar. 

In all the spare time we had we made 
things for it. It took about a month to 
make the things for it. 

The girls made doll dresses, needle 
books, napkin holders and note books. 
And the boys made animals, aeroplanes, 
and doll chairs. 

As the day drew nearer we decorated 
the booths and they looked very pretty. 
At one booth we sold towels and iron 
holders, at another dolls, another candle 
holders and at another animals. 

A few children sold the things from the 
fourth and a few from the eighth. 

The money went to buy a stage for our 
Greek Plays for the fourth grade. The 
eighth grade are going to use their 
money to help furnish their room. The 
whole bazaar was a success 

FRANK COLE. 
KIRTLAND McCOMBS. 
ELIZABETH RUFENER. 



THE HERO 

Said Phil to Ed., "We should win in the 
ice skating race. You get your ice skates 
and come over if you can. I will get 
mine and we will practice on the old 
pond back of our house. Bring Rover, 
too. Meet me at three o'clock at the 
pond." 

The boys and Rover thought the pond 
was fine. At first they tried their best 
in skating alone but after awhile they 
decided to skate with arms hooked. 

It was getting toward night when they 
were skating too fast to stop and they 
skated into a hole. Phil called for 
Rover. Now Rover was true to his mas- 
ter. He tugged and pulled till he pulled 
him out by the collar and Phil helped his 
friend out. The boys did win the ice 
skating race. Rover was praised for sav- 
ing the winners of the ice skaters. Rover 
was bought a new collar. 

CLAYTON ALDEN, Grade 5. 



CHRISTMAS SEALS 

Last year we sold Christmas seals. 
The money went to help fight tubercu-) 
losis. The Sixth Grade sold over a thous- 
and. The Training School together sold 
eight thousand, seven hundred, thirteen. 

DORIS DIXON, Grade 6. 



OUR PLAY GROUND 

Our Play Ground is a pleasant place 
Where every child can play. 
You see us there at noon and night 
Of every single day. 

You see us on the Giant Stride 

A riding round and round. 

And when we don't hang on right good 

We fall plump to the ground. 

The Fireman's Ladder we do climb, 
We climb right to the top. 
And when we want to reach the ground 
We just slide down ker-slop. 

We just hop on the Ocean Wave 
And round and round we ride. 
It seems to us like a Merry-go-round 
So happily we glide. 

ELIZABETH RUFENER, Grade 4. 

THE PLAY WE ALL LOVED 

The fairy story, "Snow White and the 
Seven Dwarfs," was the play given by 
the children of the Training School in 
December. The fairies, nymphs, dwarfs, 
brownies, witches, flowers, black cats, 
owls, the Frog, the Queen, the Fairy 
Queen, the Hunter and the Jealous Prin- 
cess were all there. 



CHESTNUT "i" BURB^ 



Miss Reed was a friend to all in the 
cast, and all in the cast were friends of 
Miss Reed, and worked hard to take the 
parts she helped them with. 

The people were very fond of the witch- 
es, for they made them feel that every- 
thing was true at one time. When the 
cats howled behind the scenes it sound- 
ed to the audience as If they were real 
cats. The fairies were mostly the kin- 
dergarten tots. They did very well for 
their age. The fairy queen did very 
well, although she had a lot to say. The 
jealous Princess did very well indeed. 
She acted as if she were naturally jeal- 
ous of everyone but herself. The hunter 
seemed to forget he was just a boy. And 
it seemed to him as if he were a man. 
Snow White was very good. All of the 
costumes were beautiful. The brownies 
and dwarfs danced their little dance very 
well. Really, all did well. 

HELEN CLUPP, Grade 4. 



AUTUMN'S FEAST 

Autumn is giving a party today. 

What will we give her? 

What will we give her? 

"I'll give my leaves," the oak seemed to 
say. 

"I think," said the chestnut, "she'd be 
pleased with a burr." 

VIRGINIA RUSSELL, Grade 6. 



There was a man named Jack, 

He visited a man named Mack, 

He sat on a tack 

It is a fact. 

He jumped so high he never came back. 



LOUIS FOGG, Grade 6. 




CHESTNUT "i" BUPP^ 



A TRUE STORY 



Dorothy has a little dog. 

Its hair is white as snow, 

Everywhere that Dorothy goes 
The dog is sure to go. 




Sixth Grade 
Drawings by Earl Franklin 
Verses by Dorothy Dirkson 



Bunny's fur is smooth and black. 
He's much afraid of my dog Jack. 
He's fond of clover at his meals. 
And when he s hurt he al\^'ays squeels. 



Matilda was to sit on the table. 

But she acted as though wasn't able. 

For she squirmed and w^iggled, 

And we children giggled. 

But Matilda wouldn't stay on the table. 




Lowell Van Deusen 
Sixth Grade 




^,lkl 



Emmet Stopher, Jr. 
Sixth Grade 



CHESTNUT "{" DURP^ 



SOCIAL CALENDAR 



AUTUMN, 1921 

September 23 Y. W. C. A. Reception to New Members. 

24 Faculty Women's Club Picnic. 

25 Y. W. C. A. (Mr. Rumold). 

Octooer 2 Y. W. C. A. (Eaglesmere report). 

6-7 Y. W. C. A, Conference with Miss Halsey, Student Secretary 

8 Football (St. Ignatius). 

9 Y. W. C. A. Students. 

14 High School Senior Party. 

16 Y. W. C. A. (Mr. Manchester). 

17 Woman's Executive Board Meeting. 

19 Faculty Women's Executive Board Meeting. 

20 Entertainment Course (Secrets of Suzanne). 

21 College Class Hallowe'en Party. 

22 Moulton Hall Hard Times Party. 

23 Y. W. C. A. Installation of Offlcers. 
25 Home and School League Party. 

27 High School Girls' Friendly Society 

28 Northeastern Ohio Teachers Meeting. 

28 Kent Dinner, Cleveland. 

29 Football (Ashland at Kent). 

31 Woman's League Executive Board Meeting. 

November 4 Senior Class Dance. 

5 College Men's Club Stunt Party. 

6 Y. W. C. A. (Miss Bayliss). 
10 Y. W. C. A. (Mile. Bidgrain). 

14 Woman's League Executive Board Meeting. 

16 Home and School League Demonstration. 

17 Faculty Women's Club. 

18 Junior Class Party. 

19 Off Campus Group Party. 

20 Y. W. C. A. (Miss Hitchcock and Students). 
22 Woman's League Tea. 

28 Woman's League Executive Board Meeting. 



December 1 Training School Entertainment ("Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"). 

2 Training School Entertainment ("Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs"). 

3 Y. W. C. A. Bazaar. 

4 Y. W. C. A. (Miss Davis — Dickens' "Christmas Carol") 
6 College Men's Club 'Vaudeville. 

8 Household Arts Club Supper. 

9 Senior Class Party. 
10 College Class Party. 

12 Woman's League Executive Board Meeting. 

13 Woman's League Executive Board Meeting. 
16 High School Boy's Banquet (Lowry Hall). 
16 Basket Ball (Ashland). 



CHESTNUT 'f(" DURP^ 



WINTER QUARTER, 1922 

January 7 High School Party. 

8 Y. W. C. A. (Miss Davis). 

12 Faculty Women's Club (Galesworthy's "Man of Property," Miss Bayliss). 

15 Y. W. C. A. (Student's Program). 

16 Entertainment Course (Lorado Taft). 
20 Vaudeville, by the Kent Kollege Klub. 

22 Y. W. C. A. (Supt. W. A. Walls). 

23 Entertainment Course (Enrique Ros, Pianist). 
29 Y. W. C. A. (Student's Program). 

February 4 Faculty Women's Club (Musical Program). 

5 Y. W. C. A. (Miss Davis). 

12 Y. W. C. A. 

18 Y. W. C. A. Colonial Party. 

19 Y. W. C. A. (Miss Prentice). 

24 Home-Coming Play ("Clarence"). 

25 Home-Coming Luncheon. 

25 Home-Coming Party (Senior's "at home" to h(jme-comers). 

March 4 Senior Carnival. 

5 Y. W. C. A. (Mr. Stopher), 

9 Faculty Women's Club (Galesworthy's "In Chancery," Miss Shamel). 
12 Y. W. C. A. 

March 4 Senior Carnival. 



April 



SPRING QUARTER, 1922 

26 Y. W. C. A. (Miss Davis). 

29 Entertainment Course (Theodore Karle, Tenor). 

2 Y W. C. A. (Miss Hitchcock). 

7 Debating Club. 

10 Y. W. C. A. 

20 Brown University Glee Club. 

23 Y. W. C. A. 



May 5 Woman's League Recepticn to New Students. 

7 Y. W. C. A. 

12 Physical Education Demonstration. 

30 Woman's League Third Annual Tree Dedication. 

June 2 Annual Field Day. 

3 Senior Formal. 

4 Baccalaureate Sunday. 

7 Annual Campus Night. 

8 Junior-Senior Reception. 

9 High School Commencement. 
10 Ninth Annual Commencement. 



117 



CHESTNUT "{" DUPB^ 




CHESTNUT ///// BURP^ 




CHESTNUT "f" DUPP^ 

JOKES 

Scene — Dining Hall on Review Day. Dorothy Knox, asking the blessing: "Lord, we 
thank Thee tor this food which is prepared for us again." 

I'd rather be a could be. 

If I couldn't be an are: 

For a could be is a may be, 

With a chance of touching par. 

I'd rather be a has been, 

Than a might have been by far: 

For a might have been has never been 

But a has was once an are." 

Paradise — A shady room, an open Are, a cozy nook, your heart's desire. 
Purgatory — The self-same room, with lights a few. 
The self-same nook and Ma there, too. 

Anne N. — "I believe in free speech, I do." 

Wilbur P. — "You don't suppose anyone would pay to hear you, do you?" 

Bill Hargett — "There has been something trembling on my lips for months and 
months." 

She — "Yes, so I see. Why don't you shave it off?" 

M. H. — "Dick doesn't do everything I tell; if he did, I would be wearing a diamond." 

Mary T. — "You've got that history on your brain." 

Isobel C. — "It's better to have it on my brain now, than on my hands next year." 

We wonder why: 

Anna Skipp giggles so much. 

Lyda does not dye her hair. 

Lucile Shafer does not live in the dorm. 

Mary Love does not expand. 

Esther Manns does not break when she bends. 

Florence Critz always keeps so sweet. 

Chubby Dille does not finish growing his mustache. 

We cannot separate Anne and Wilbur. 

Alice Beane is so coquetish. 

"Spinny'' smiles so sweetly of late. 

Mr. Chandler quotes "Thorndike." 

Edna Lehet rolls her eyes. 

Instructor: "Ventilate that song," 

Student: "What do you mean; something the matter?" 

Instructor: "The air is poor." 

Prof. (After explaining the various important features of chemistry) : "So you see 
that we owe a great deal to chemistry. Anyone in the class can give another example 
of practical chemical importance?" 

Student: "According to the given explanations we are enormously indebted to chem- 
istry for the bountiful lot of our blondes." 

Prof (after explaining the principles of photography) : "Consequently, the photo- 
graphic developments depends exclusively upon that little dark room." 

A Whisper: "Say, Fred, if that's true, ask Mr. Rumold what is the difference between 
photographic developments and love-making." 

Proving that a sheet of writing paper is equal to a lazy dog: 

Proof: A sheet of writing paper=:an ink-lined plane. An Inclined plane=a slope up. 
A slow pup^a lazy dog. 

Mr. Rumold: "Whenever there is something you don't know jusi go back to these 
fundamentals." 

Mr. Cora: "But, we are getting new fundamentals every day." 

Mr. Carnahan: "Is there no difference between Icve and like in French?" 
Mr. Boulet: "Yes, But I thought you were big enough to know that." 
Mr. Cora: "What do we call "distraire" in English?" 
Mr. Boulet: "Spooning." 

120 



\ 



CHESTNUT ///// DURP^ 

Mr. Ivins: "Where does egg plant grow?" 
Pupil: "On bushes." 

Mr. Ivins: "Where do grapenuts grow?" 
Pupil: "On trees." 

Mr. Chandler: "How far is it from ear to ear?" 
Bright Pupil: "One block." 

Mr. Ivins: "Why do they garnish food?" 
Miss Hackett: "So it will go down better." 

Says the co-ed: "Why not wear socks? Don't we have knee-caps?" 

Miss Hyde: "With outside foot, grasp partner's hand shoulder high." 

Mr. Chandler, in speaking of children in the south who came to school, said: 
"They have a cold all winter because they didn't dress properly. They didn't wear col- 
lars or collar buttons." 

They were listening to a concert, nearby was a popcorn vendor's stand. She: "My! 
That popcorn smells good!" 

He: "Yes. I'll drive closer so you can smell it better." 

Conductor: "Here, you're ringing the bell at both ends of the car." 
Brakeman: "Sure, 1 want both ends to stop." 

He: "I love the good, the true, the beautiful." 

She: "This is so sudden, but I know father will consent." 

"Dat ole man o' yours is a pretty good provider." 

"Yea, he'd ruther I'd use the skillet fer a utensil than a weapon." 

"Can she talk, old man?" 

"Can she? Say, last summer, on the mountains, she didn't even let the echo have 
the last word." 

Mr. Carnahan: "What are the chances of my recovering, doctor?" 

Doctor Beckwith: "One hundred percent. Medical records show that nine out of 

every ten die of the disease you have. Yours is the tenth case I've treated. Others all 

died. You're bound to get well. Statistics are statistics." 

CONUNDRUMS 

1. When did the fly fly? 

2. Why is a hot cake like a caterpillar? 

3. Why is the letter "A" like a honeysuckle? 

4. What belongs to yourself exclusively but is used more by others than by your- 
self? 

0. What asks no questions but requires many answers? 

6. When is a tooth not a tooth? 

7. What is an extra dry subject? 

8. What can often be caught but never seen? 

9. Why cannot any quadruped enter a city garden? 

10. When is an automobile mentioned in the Bible? 

11. What is the political character of an auto tire? 

12. What runs constantly between cities, but is itself immovable? 

13. What would you call a boy who eats all the green apples he can get? 

14. How could you divide seventeen apples among eleven small boys if four of them 
are rather small? 

15. How is a vote in Congress like a bad cold? 

16. To what trade does every United States President belong? 

17. What was Adam's favorite song? 

18. Why is music cheapest on Sunday? 

19. Take away all my letters, I remain the same. 

20. Why is a portrait like a member of Congress? 

21. What key in music would make a good army officer? 

22. If the postmaster went to the zoo and a tiger ate him, what time would it be? 

23. Why is the letter "G" like one who has left a party? 

121 



CHESTNUT '"jf DURB^ 

24. Wisen is milady's dress like a chair? 

25. Why is a luggage van like a forest? 

26. Why should one not take a nap on a railroad train? 

27. What is the latest prescription for seasickness? 

28. When was medicine mentioned in the Bible? 

29. What could be worse than a giraffe with a sore throat? 

30. Why are doctors bad characters? 

31. Why is "U" the gayest letter in the alphabet? 

32. What is always invisible, but never out of sight? 

33. What is a true soldier's definition of a kiss? 

34. What occurs twice in a moment but not once in a thousand years? 

35. Why does the Russian soldier wear brass buttons on his coat, and the Italia;i 
wear silver? 

36. Why do women make good postoffice clerks? 

37. What is one rule of war? 

38. Why is the American Eagle like an enterprising business man? 

39. What is the fruit of finance? 

40. When was beef the highest? 

41. If the President and all the cabinet should die, who would officiate? 

42. Where is a donkey like a Scotchman? 

43. Of what did Job's wardrobe consist? 

44. Why was Adam's first day the longest? 

45. What is the difference between a nickle and a penny? 

46. That that is is that that is not is not. 



(See advertising Section for answers to these conundrums.) 



CHESTNUT "('' DURP^ 




SNAPS 
123 



CHESTNUT "'ji DURH^ 




SNAPS 
124 



CHESTNUT "(" DUPP^ 




SNAPS 
125 



CHESTNUT '"jf DUPP^ 



KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

K stands for Kent, where our college is at, 
E is for hard English, but it's good dope at that. 
N is for note book, and many you'll need, 
T's for the tears which teachers ne'er heed. 
S is tor State, that keeps up our school, 
T is for time, spend much — you're no fool. 
A is for answers, we all try to get, 
T stands for truth, it's the best way out yet. 
E's tor Exchange, with books, candy, and cake. 
N is for Normal, a course teachers must take. 
O's for the Grand Order of K. K. K. 
R's for reminiscences of a happier day. 
IVl is for Moulton, a girl's dorm, you know 
A's for Athletics, in which we are law. 
L stands for Library, the best in the State. 
C is for College, where all meet their fate. 
O's for Off-Campus, they're a mighty fine bunch. 
L is for Lowry, the girl's dorm, I've a hunch. 
L is for love, where most ladies stop. 
E is for Education, which most of them drop. 
G means Gossip, "We all help it," one says. 
E stands for the end of our Normal School days. 
Put them all together, and you'll plainly see, 
It's what we all love most, our own 
K. S. N. C. 

K. L. POLGER. 



CHESTNUT "i" DUPP^ 



AMfWHDITS 



KENT STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 




Graduates 
of this 
course 
become 
successful 
City 

Superin- 
tendents 

High 

School 
Principals 

High 

School 
Teachers 
District 
Super- 
intendents 
Super- 
visors 
etc. 



School Calendar 1922-1923 

FALL QUARTER 

Registration of former students— 1 :00 P. M. to 4:00 P. M. 

Monday Sept. 18, 1922. 
Registration of new students— 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. Tuesday Sept. 1 9, 1 922. 
Class Work begins-8. A. M. .Wednesday, Sept. 20, 1922. 
Thanksgiving recess begins — 12 M., Wednesday, Nov. 29, 1922. 
School Convenes— 12 M., December 4, 1922. 
Term ends-4. P. M. Friday, December, 15, 1922. 

WINTER QUARTER 

Class work begins — 8. A. M., Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1923. 
Term ends— 4. P. M., March 16, 1923. 

SPRING QUARTER 

Class work begins— 8. A. M., March 19, 1923. 
Commencement — Saturday, June 10, 1923. 

SUMMER QUARTER, First Half 

Registration— 8: A. M- to 4 P. M., Monday, June 18, 1923. 
Class work begins — 8 A. M-, Tuesday, June 19, 1923- 
Term ends— 4- P. M-, Friday, July 27, 1913. 

Second Half 
Registration— 8:30 A. M. to 4- P. M., Monday, July 30, 1923. 
Class work begins — 8- A. M-, Tuesday, July 31, 1923- 
Term ends— 4. P. M-, Friday, August 31, 1923- 

Write to President J. E. McGilvrey, 
Kent, O., for catalogue. 



TWO 
YEAR 
COURSE 
leading 
to 

Diploma 
and State 
Life Cer- 
tificate. 

Prepares 
Teachers 
for any 
Grade, 
Kinder- 
garten 
to the 
High 
School 
and for 
the 

teaching 
of special 
subjects 
as Music 
Art, 
House- 
hold 
Science 
and 

Manual 
Training. 



CALVIN p. RAUSCH SMITH H. LINE FRED ZAPPOLO 

NORMAL EXCHANGE 

BOOKS 

AND 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



ALL OF YOU KNOW ALL OF US 



GENSEMER BROS. 



SUCCESSORS TO 



THE ERANGE DRY GOODS GO. 



RETAILERS OF 



Ladies' and Children's Ready-to- Wear Garments 
Millinery, Dry Goods, Draperies 

FLOOR COVERINGS, WALL PAPER 



Ladies', Misses' and Ghildren's Shoes 



The Behning Piano 

THE ARTIST'S FAVORITE 




THE NEW EDISON is the only instru- 
ment that stands the test of direct com- 
parison with the living artist. 

ALL THE LATEST ''HITS" IN SHEET 
MUSIC AND EDISON RE-CREATIONS 

OLIN & SON 



Quality Music Store 

135 E. MAIN STREET KENT, OHIO 



THE PRINCESS LUNCH 

Our Menus Changed 
Twice Daily 



Ask About Our 31c Meals 



THE PRINCESS LUNCH 



America's Leading 
Educational Journals 

They represent the highest standard 
of Education thought. Popular Edu- 
cator for Grammar grades and rural 
schools — $2.00 per year. Primary 
Education for Primary grades — $2.00 
per year. 

Teachers' Helps, English Classics, Augsburg's Drawing, School 

Text Books and Supplementary Reading 

CATALOGUE UPON REQUEST 

EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHING CO. 

18 EAST 17TH ST. NEW YORK 

S. G. BISSLER & SON 

COMPLETE 

HOME FURNISHERS 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Invalid Car Service Grafonolas and Records 
PHONE 530 

112-114 E. MAIN ST. KENT, O. 



I. P. HARGER 

School 
Supplies 

128 N. WATER STREET 
KENT, OHIO 

ALL KINDS OF 

FINE PASTRY 

GOOD ROLLS AND BREAD 

AT THE 

MODERN BAKERY 

316 South Water Street 



5— THE DOORBELL. 



6— WHEN IT IS A KING. 



An appreciation of the patronage from the Student 
body of Kent State Normal College 



FROM 



HALE B. THOMPSON'S 

"Not only a drug store but an institution based 
on service and quality" 

COR. MAIN & WATER STS. KENT, OHIO. 



THE BOOK STORE 

We carry a complete line of books, stationery, sheet music, camera 

supplies, Conklin fountain pens, Eversharp pencils, Pennants, 

and greeting cards. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE STUDENT 

We do expert photo developing and printing 

STEINER & DARLING 

"The Biggest Little Store In Town" 
Two doors south of the Post Office. KENT, OHIO 

Whenever U-NEED-A-LUNCH 

Don't fail to call on us 

HOME COOKING 

Our Pastries are Unsurpassed 

Famous for STEAKS and CHOPS 

123 W. MAIN ST. - - - - KENT, O. 

22—8 P. M. 23— IT MAKES ONE GONE. 



TELEPHONE 452 

8 ii 


WE SPECIALIZE IN 


Leo A. Bietz, Mgr. 


Shoe Repairing 


Imperial 


ALL WORK GUARANTEED 


Dry Cleaning Co. 


WE ALSO HAVE ALL KINDS OF 


OPERATING THE ONLY 


Laces, Insoles and Polishes 


DRY CLEANING PLANT 


j f 


IN KENT 




i -- -^ 


K. DORMAIER & CO. 


149 South Water Street 


Rapid Shoe Repairing 


KENT, OHIO 


121 N. WATER ST. KENT, OHIO 


Gibson & Ott 


1 1. C T.ongcoy 




GOOD THINGS 


Spstaurant 


TO EAT 

You will enjoy our Home 




Cooked Meats. We have 


I-- . m 


Everything for your 


Cor. Main and Franklin 


Lunches and Spreads 


t m 


Come In and See Us 


PHONE 124 KENT, OHIO 


124 South Water Street 




OPPOSITE POSTOFFICE 



10— ELIJAH WENT UP ON HIGH. 



11— REVOLUTIONARY. 



®lj? Kmt National lank 



OUR SERVICE 

Is founded upon the conviction that helpful co-operation is 
necessary if a banking service is to be of maximum value. 

q THE KENT NATIONAL BANK belongs to the FED- 
ERAL RESERVE SYSTEM because its membership broad- 
ens materially its opportunities to co-operate with customers, 
even as it provides that additional assurance of safety which 
comes from sharing in the strength and unity of the greatest 
and strongest banking association in the w^orld. 



®l|r Kmt Nattnnal lank 

KENT, OHIO 



45— FOUR CENTS. 46 — THAT THAT IS, IS; THAT THAT IS NOT, IS NOT. 

134 




^ A woman's Dressing Table is a true re- 
flection of her personality. 

^ Her Powders, Creams, Talcs and Toilet 
Waters should express good taste, charm 
and daintiness. 

Wnv Sntlrt (Boahn (Homxtn 

Is w^aiting to serve you with a complete 
variety of essentials for your toilet. 



W. H. DONAGHY DRUG CO. 




CARA NOME 



JONTEEL 



BEAUTIFUL SHOES 

AT 

KENT'S EXCLUSIVE SHOE STORE 

The footwear presented is not only facinating and representative of the models being favored 
but the values, our ability to perfectly combine artistic styles and genuine economy in the selling 
of Shoes. 

Keds and All Rubber Soled Footwear for College Use. 

COOK'S SHOE STORE 



118 N. WATER ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



E. D. DAVIS' SONS 

THE 
HALL MARK 

JEWELERS 



125 N. WATER ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



7— A MUMMY. 

8— PASSING REMARKS. 

9— THERE CAN BE ONLY THREE FEET IN A YARD. 
19— THE POSTMAN. 
20— IT IS ONLY REPRESENTATIVE. 
21— A SHARP MAJOR. 

3_"B" FOLLOWS IT. 

4 — YOUR NAME. 



Kent's Leading Place of Amusement 

KENT OPERA HOUSE 

Highest Class Attractions, Per feet Order, Service, Re fined and Attractive 

Featuring Famous Players, Lasky Corporation 

Associated -First -National Picture Also Including Good Comedy 

Get the Habit- -Go To The Opera House 
JOHN PALFI, Owner. KENT, O. 

Everything in Clothing, Shoes and Furnishings 
for MEN, YOUNG MEN and BOYS 

LADIES' HOSE 
COE LIVINGSTON 

"Advertiser of facts only" 
KENT, O. 

Compliments of 

THE SHOPPE 

Cor. Lincoln and Main Sts. 
KENT, O. 

R. VJ. Black 



R. J. DILLINGER 
lakrrg nnh (Srorpry ^unsljitip Srpaii 

Where quality, goods, and low prices prevail. Teachers and Stu- 
dents will always find a complete line of baked goods, also Shelf 
Groceries and Confections at our store. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO PARTIES 
AND SPECIAL ORDERS 



127 W. MAIN ST. 



PHONE 509 



KENT, OHIO 



Compliments of 


HELEN DAVIES, Proprietor 


The Gillespie Electric Co, 

OPPOSITE POSTOFFICE 


151 S. WATER ST. SECOND FLOOR 
KENT OHIO 




Special Prices to College Students 



36— THEY KNOW HOW TO HANDLE THE MAILS. 
37_|T IS DEATH TO STOP A MACHINE GUN BULLET. 
38— YOU FIND HIM WHEREVER THERE IS A DOLLAR. 
40— WHEN THE COW JUMPED OVER THE MOON. 



HULBERT & BARNABY 

CONFECTIONERY 

DEALERS IN 

Confectionery, Cigars and Tobacco 
Telling's Ice Cream Main Street 



FACIAL MASSAGE 



SHAMPOO 



Miller's Barber Shop 



HAIR BOBBING 
A SPECIALTY 



113 MAIN ST. 



KENT, OHIO 



THE CITY BANK 

KENT, OHIO 



ORGANIZED 1881 



Capital Paid in $125,000.00 
Surplus Fund $58,000.00 



on Time Deposits 



OFFICERS 

H. H. LINE, Chairman of Board 
M. G. GARRISON, President 

D. L. ROCKWELL, Vice President 

E. F. GARRISON, Secretary -Treasurer 
R. L. SAMPSELL, Assistant Treasurer 



12— A HIGHWAY. 13— A PAINSTAKING YOUNGSTER. 



CARLILE & BACHTEL 

Plumbiivg, Heatiivo and Lightiivg 
Tin and Furnack Work 



PHONE SHOP 333 



248 NORTH M'ATER STREET 



ELGIN & WETMORE 

Jewelers Engravers Optometrists 

114 N. Water St. 

Make this your headquarters for Normal College 
Jewelry and Repairs 

We are the originators of the Kent Normal Seal 


Compliments of 

W. L. STECHEL 

Contractor 

Office - Chas. Kent Block 


24 — WHEN IT IS SATIN. 

25— IT IS FULL OF TRUNKS. 

26— TRAINS RUN ON SLEEPERS. 

27— BOLT YOUR FOOD DOWN. 

14 — MAKE APPLE SAUCE. 

15— SOMETIMES THE "AYES" HAVE IT, SOME- 
TIMES THE "NOES." 

16— CABINET MAKER. 


The best drink in Winter or 
Summer is 

CHASE & SANBORNS COFFEE & TEA 
KNEIFELS GROCERY 

KENT, 0. 


YOU will probably find SMITH & BAKER'S 
HOME-MADE PIES wherever you eat in Kent 

YOU will surely find them at 

SMITH & BAKER'S 

125 East Main St., Kent, 0. 

Telephone 515 

Open from 7 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

They're fine for picnics and parties. 


McGrath & Fisher 

133 South Water St. 
Phone 670 

Dealers in Fresh and Smoked Meats 



T. W. Darwell 


KENT 


Cleveland Plain Dealer 


ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIR SHOP 


Agency 


Repairing While You Wait 


MAGAZINES 


All Work Guaranteed 


CANDIES FRUITS 
REFRESHMENTS 


FIRST CLASS 


134 EAST MAIN STREET 


JOHN TONKIN 113 Erie Street 


Acme No. 26 at Ravenna 


Compliments of 


Acme No. 27 at Kent 


APPLE & FENN 


ALWAYS READY TO 


Restaurant 


SERVE YOU 




Kent Baking 


Harold Curtiss 


Company 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 


Confectionery & Ice Cream 


116 South Water Street 


Home Made Candy 


PHONE 603 


Special Orders a Specialty 


KENT, OHIO 


PHONE 52 138 N. WATER ST. 


Curtiss & Gooch 


28— WHEN MOSES TOOK TWO TABLETS. 
29— A CENTIPEDE WITH CORNS. 


119 North Water St. 


32— SI. 




33— A REPORT FROM HEADQUARTERS. 


Fancy and Staple Groceries 

Fruits and Vegetables 


34— M. 

41— THE UNDERTAKER. 

42— IN THE BONNIE, BONNIE BRAES. 


Trade Here and Save Money 


39— CURRANT COINS. 




35— TO KEEP HIS COAT BUTTONED. 


PHONE 75 KENT, OHIO 





Trory's Drug Store 

Eastman Kodaks and Supplies 

WE MAKE OUR OWN ICE CREAM 



PHONE 4 



MAIN STREET 



1— WHEN THE SPIDER SPIED HER. 

2— IT MAKES THE BUTTERFLY. 

43— THREE WRETCHED COMFORTERS. 

44 — IT HAD NO EVE. 

17— "ONLY ONE GIRL IN THE WHOLE WORLD FOR ME." 

18— WE GET IT BY THE PIECE THROUGH THE WEEK, AND BY THE QUIRE ON 

SUNDAY. 

30— THE WORSE PEOPLE ARE THE MORE THEY ARE WITH THEM. 

31 — IT IS ALWAYS IN THE MIDST OF FUN. 



BURNS' 

BARBER SHOP 

HAIR BOBBING 

A 

SPECIALTY 

145 N. Water St. Kent, Ohio 



Patronize 
Our Advertisers 



J. C GIGGER 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Stoves and Building Material 

LONE BROTHERS 
PAINTS AND VARNISHES 



KAHN'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

Ladies', Men's and Children's Furnishings 

For duality, Style and Lowest Prices 
Buy at 

KAHN'S 

Opposite Post Office 



CHESTNUT "(ii DURB^ 



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i©m© 



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PROCESSIONAL. 



Z>on Bresenzer. 



Ruth Hartlerode. 



^S 



Moderalo. 




Z^=^ZZ 



2. A ha - : 

3. And tliouu'li 



=§*^- 



song, Kent Nor - mul, 
bright, Kent Nor - mal, 
leave joiir cam - pus, 



Our 

We 

In 



=P=: 




voic - 63 how we raise; 
place in Mem' - ry's hallw, 
aft - er years we'll yearn 



We sing each 
Of Loy - al 
To speed tlie 



one, 

day 



Kent Nor - 
Kent Nor - mal, 
tlie fu - ture 



Deep 
En- 
Holds 







heart-felt words of praise. With love we'll e'er re-vereyou, With pride well speak your 

diir-ing as your walls. Firm bonds of love and friendship Will bind us close to 

forth for our re - turn. A - gain we'll tread j'our pathways, Once more we'll vie™ your 



WJ: 



^ 



:i=*^:ff= 



3=U= 



z^_= 



3?E 



1^ 



=ife= 



^ 



i 



3^^&s; 



fame, 
true, 
calls. 



name. With' joy - ous-ness we'll cher - ish 

you, These bonds we ne'er will sev - er, 

walls, Re - gret will mark our part - ing- 



The splen-dor of your 
Bach day will find them 
When. 110 - ble du - ty 



^ 4 I I -^^^=^ — T^ H-— I 



^^ 



If 



CHESTNUT "i" DUPP^ 



.MANCHESTER. 

Li Strict nsrcb time. 



0-H-I-O 



KATHLEEN BOYD- 21 



1. We'll sing to Keot. We'll sing to state 
a. We'll yell for Kent. Well yell for state 
S.We'Ufighf for Kent. We'll fight for state 



We'll sing to Col-lege 
We'll yell for Col -lege 
We'll fight for Col — lege 




Well siug to loy— al Buck— eye me 
We'll yell for loy — al Buck-eye me 
We'll figtt for loy-al Buck-eye me: 



And worn- en^ brave and 
And worn- en brave and 
And worn- en 




We'll keep our sing— er 
We'll keep our yell — er 
We'll keep our fight— er 



full of sing, 
full of yelT; 
full of fight, 



Wher— ev— er we may go, 
Wher— ev— er we may go, 
Wber— ev — er we may go , 




Well sing to O. We'll sing 

We'll yell for 0. We'll yell for HI 

We'll fight foj- 0. We'll fight for HI 



We'll sing to 
We'll yell for 
We'll fight for 



- HI - O 
- HI - O 
O - HI - b 




Copyright 



CHESTNUT ///// DUPP^ 



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CHESTNUT "I" DURB^ 



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CHESTNUT "{'f DUPP^ 



An Appreciation 

To all — faculty, students, advertisers, 
and purchasers — who have made this book 
possible, we dedicate this page. 

The Annual Board. 



F